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2024 conference program

Our 2024 'Expanding Horizons' Conference in Saskatoon is taking shape!


Saturday May 4th: Pre Conference Events

8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Plain Language Workshop

Arts 109, University of Saskatchewan

Register here!

Science writing is supposed to be dense, written in passive voice, and filled with jargon. Isn’t it?

Jargon can be a convenient shorthand when you’re communicating with others who also speak that language. However, it doesn’t work well when you’re trying to communicate with a non-scientific audience. For that matter, even other scientists might not understand you if they’re not from the same discipline.

In this interactive workshop, we’ll explore plain language and how to use it to make your science and technical communication easier to understand. Some of the questions we’ll tackle together include:

  • Why should we use plain language in science and technical communication?
  • Who benefits from plain language?
  • What are some of the barriers to using plain language in science?
  • How can we overcome those barriers?

By the end of the workshop, you will have a good understanding of what plain language is and the benefits of using it to make your science communication more accessible and engaging. You’ll practice using plain language techniques to make your writing more effective and engaging and apply plain language design principles to improve readability.

Michelle Boulton is the managing director of 3c Publications. She began her career as a journalist, worked in marketing and print production, and eventually launched her own company. 3c Publications is a collaborative team of communication professionals (writers, editors, translators, and designers) with diverse skills and experience in a wide range of industries.

They use evidence-based clear communication (or plain language) principles to help clients translate complex information into content that is clear and easy for everyone to understand and use. They work with a broad range of clients, including Ag-West Bio, Canadian Association of Bovine Practitioners, Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction, Canadian Radiation Protection Association, NexGen Energy, Saskatchewan Polytechnic, and Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization (VIDO).

Michelle is a member of SWCC, a past president of Editors Canada, and the current head of Plain Canada Clair.

1:00 PM - 4:30 PM

Canadian Light Source + VIDO+ 

Rayner Dairy Research and Teaching Facility Tour

Register here!

Join us for a pre-conference guided tour of three pinnacle research institutions settled on the grounds of the University of Saskatchewan, the Canadian Light SourceThe Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization (VIDO) and the Rayner Dairy Research and Teaching Facility.

About the Facilities:


The Canadian Light Source (CLS) is one of the largest science projects in Canada’s history. Our facility speeds up electrons to produce intensely bright synchrotron light that allows scientists to study materials at a molecular level. Over 1,000 researchers from around the world use the CLS every year. On your tour, you'll learn about our history, how our machine works, and examples of how researchers have used our facility to conduct ground-breaking research in the fields of health, agriculture, the environment, and advanced materials.

Website: https://www.lightsource.ca/

The Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization (VIDO) is Canada’s Centre for Pandemic Research. Part of the University of Saskatchewan, VIDO is a leader in human and animal infectious disease research and vaccine development. For almost 50 years, VIDO has developed solutions to emerging diseases including eight commercially available vaccines—six of which were world's firsts. VIDO has some of the largest and most advanced level 3 containment facilities in the world and is expanding its specialized infrastructure to include a GMP manufacturing facility, a new housing animal facility, and level 4 containment research capacity.

Website: www.vido.org


Located in the Rayner Dairy Research and Teaching Facility at the University of Saskatchewan, the Feeding the World Interpretive Center uses dairy production as a way for visitors to explore the agricultural story of Saskatchewan and its role in global food production. Featuring an overhead walkway, the barn provides a bird’s-eye view of the herd, milking parlour and computer-based milking robot.

Website: the Rayner Dairy Research and Teaching Facility

7:00 PM

Opening Reception

Bokeh Lounge - Alt Hotel

Sunday May 5th: Conference Sessions

8:00 AM - 8:45 AM

Registration: Breakfast Provided

8:45 AM - 9:00 AM

Welcoming Remarks

9:00 AM - 10:00 AM

Opening Keynote: A Co-presentation by

Dr. Priscilla Settee and Diya Khamar

Indigo Room

Dr. Priscilla Settee is professor emeritus in the College of Arts & Science at the U of S. She is Swampy Cree and a member of Cumberland House First Nation. Dr. Settee is the author of several books, including PIMATISIWIN: The Good Life, Global Indigenous Knowledge Systems and The Strength of Women: Âhkamêyimowak. Her latest co-edited book is Indigenous Food Systems: Concepts, Cases, and Conversations. Among her honours includes being named one of the three recipients of a 2019-20 David Suzuki Fellowship. She was also one of 21 Indigenous organizers, activists, social entrepreneurs and cultural practitioners from across North America to be named a 2021 NDN Changemaker Fellow.

Diya Khamar is an ambitious undergraduate student specializing in biomedical sciences. She has a passion for digital marketing and is fascinated by the art of science communication. She is dedicated to bridging the gap between complex scientific concepts and a broader audience. Her commitment to conveying the wonder of research in an accessible manner has led her to explore and integrate science, marketing, and artistic expression.

Break 10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Bridging Worlds: Sharing Science Across Generations, Cultures, and Knowledge Ecosystems

Indigo Room

Join us to explore communication and knowledge transmission strategies for youth-focused STEM outreach. Panelists CJ Woodford (University of Toronto, Physics), ZHE | Zoe Slusar (USask Science Ambassador Program) and Cree Longjohn (USask Kamskénow) bring a combined decade of experience working in distinct cultural contexts, from downtown Toronto, to community schools in Saskatoon, to remote Northern Indigenous communities. What approaches resonate with community priorities in these spaces? How can attention to language and pedagogy invite community participation and conversation? How can we collaborate, as educators and science communicators, to ignite a passion for collaborative and culturally-responsive discovery among the scientists of tomorrow?

Panelists:

  • CJ Woodford 
  • ZHE (Zoe Slusar) 
  • Cree Longjohn 

Facilitator:

  • Sandy Marie Bonny

Technology Meets Communications - Open Space

Cyan Room

Generative AI can be a polarizing topic, and many communicators are taking a measured approach to exploring the potential benefits and drawbacks of this emerging technology. We are opening the conversation and making space for all the perspectives in an ongoing Open-Space-style event at our conference. A facilitated session will open the conversation, and the space will remain open for the remainder of the conference. We will then gather the input and determine how to best use it – either in ongoing member meet-ups, a position statement, or other possible approaches, depending on the direction the Open Space takes.

Faciliators:

  • Lucas Kavanagh
  • Kelly Goyer

Lunch 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Methods of Engagement for Policies that Bring Meaningful Change

Indigo Room

A conversation between stakeholders navigating colonized frameworks, working towards system change and decolonization in various organizations (universities, Indigenous governing bodies) across Turtle Island.

Panelists:

  • Candice Pete
  • Dale Worme
  • Sarah Gauthier

Technology Meets Communications - Open Space

Lime Room

Generative AI can be a polarizing topic, and many communicators are taking a measured approach to exploring the potential benefits and drawbacks of this emerging technology. We are opening the conversation and making space for all the perspectives in an ongoing Open-Space-style event at our conference. A facilitated session will open the conversation, and the space will remain open for the remainder of the conference. We will then gather the input and determine how to best use it – either in ongoing member meet-ups, a position statement, or other possible approaches, depending on the direction the Open Space takes.

Faciliators:

  • Lucas Kavanagh
  • Kelly Goyer

Break 2:30 PM - 3:00 PM

3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

Co-creating New Models for Science Communication

Indigo Room

In a changing science communication landscape, how can journalists and others continue to make a living producing quality scientific outputs? What are the benefits of working for mainstream media outlets compared to working on independent projects or building a personal brand? A panel of experts in journalism and digital communications will explore these questions, helping clarify promising new directions for science communication in Canada.

This session is intentionally scheduled at the end of the day so that any overflow discussion can spill over into happy hour.

Panelists:

  • Farha Akhtar
  • Jason Warick
  • Katrina German

An Introduction to Indigenous Ways of Knowing

Cyan Room

Journey into the world of the nehiyawak of Treat 6 territory. Come prepared to learn one indigenous language, one song, and one world view. There may also be one dance.

This will be an embodied experience of the journey of one indigenous being who studied with elders from all walks of Indigenous life.

Kitatamiskatinawaw – I acknowledge you from where I stand from my heart, mind, and body on this land we share.

Speaker:

Joseph Naytowhow, College of Law, University of Saskatchewan where he serves as Emerging Elder/Cultural Advisor.


Technology Meets Communications - Open Space

Lime Room

Generative AI can be a polarizing topic, and many communicators are taking a measured approach to exploring the potential benefits and drawbacks of this emerging technology. We are opening the conversation and making space for all the perspectives in an ongoing Open-Space-style event at our conference. A facilitated session will open the conversation, and the space will remain open for the remainder of the conference. We will then gather the input and determine how to best use it – either in ongoing member meet-ups, a position statement, or other possible approaches, depending on the direction the Open Space takes.

Faciliators:

  • Lucas Kavanagh
  • Kelly Goyer

6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Dine Around Saskatoon

In typical SWCC tradition, there will be a "Dine-Around" on Sunday night. If you are interested in the "Dine-Around" we will have a sign-up available at the registration table during the conference.

Monday May 6th: Conference Sessions

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

Breakfast

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Knowledge Mobilization Workshop

Interdisciplinarity and community work in science communication: are we ready yet?

Indigo Room

The secret sauce to successful knowledge mobilization and dissemination isn't just in the content—it's all about building trust relationships with research users. Higher education in science contrastingly values ultra specialization, leaving researchers helpless to face interdisciplinarity and community engagement demanded by funding agencies. However, "interdisciplinarity" and "community work" aren't just buzzwords. They're the keys to unlocking a world where science communication sparks real, tangible change. In this workshop, we'll work on concrete examples to navigate across disciplines and institutional cultures. We'll explore innovative solutions to connect with your audience and mobilize communities. Get ready to amplify the impact of science communication and become a catalyst for change!

Speaker:

Estelle Chamoux, professor in cell biology at Bishop's University.

Merging Art and Science

Cyan Room

We are gathering artists (to be confirmed) from various media to talk about the intersection of art and science.

Artists:

  • jake moore
  • Ruth Cuthand
  • Jérôme Côté

Break 10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

SSHRC’s 2024 Storytellers Challenge Showcase

Amazing social sciences and humanities research stories in 3 minutes or in 300 words

Remai Modern Art gallery, River View Room


What impact does social sciences and humanities research have on our lives and the world around us? Find out at the 2024 Storytellers Challenge Showcase! This annual competition challenges postsecondary students across the country to inspire audiences with a research story – in up to 300 words or three minutes – of how SSHRC-funded research is making a difference in the lives of Canadians. Join our live audience to see the Storytellers finalists compete for a Final Five spot and a chance at $1,000!

Emcee:

Stefan Keyes, Journalist, CTV News Ottawa

Judges:

Sumeep Bath, Editorial and Communications Manager, International Institute for Sustainable Development

Estelle Chamoux, Professor of cell biology and science communication, Bishop’s University

Joanna Smith, Editor in chief for Kathari News


L’événement J’ai une histoire à raconter 2024 du CRSH

Quel impact la recherche en sciences humaines a-t-elle sur nos vies et sur le monde qui nous entoure? Découvrez-le lors de l’événementJ’ai une histoire à raconter 2024! Ce concours annuel met les étudiantes et étudiants de niveau postsecondaire de partout au pays au défi d'inspirer le public avec une histoire de recherche – en 300 mots ou trois minutes maximum – sur la façon dont la recherche financée par le CRSH fait une différence dans la vie des Canadiennes et Canadiens. Joignez-vous au public en direct pour voir les finalistes s’affronter pour une place parmi les cinq grandes gagnantes et grands gagnants et une chance de gagner 1 000 $!

Animation:

Stefan Keyes, journaliste, CTV News Ottawa

Juges:

Sumeep Bath, gestionnaire, contenu éditorial et communications, International Institute for Sustainable Development

Estelle Chamoux, professeure, biologie cellulaire et communication scientifique, Bishop’s University

Joanna Smith, journaliste politique

Lunch 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Speed Mentoring: A Peer-to-Peer Support Session

Indigo Room

Join us for an opportunity to learn more about mentoring and how it can help your career and organization. Mentoring helps open the door for professional interaction and break some of the formal "ice". The goal is to help forge meaningful connections, elevate your networking and sharpen rapport-building skills in a safe and fun environment. We’ll discuss unique and valuable ways to mentor, network and engage with colleagues that share your professional interests. There's something for everyone!

Speakers:

  • MaryAnn Deutscher
  • Veronique Loewen


In the ACTIVE VOICE: Knowledge, Communication and Community

Cyan Room

This panel will feature four “science communicators” based in Saskatchewan, all of whom combine knowledge-sharing with community engagement and advocacy for the lands and waters of kihci okâwîmâw askiy, Mother Earth. Each of the participants has a different story to tell about the way they work, whether through research, writing, visual art, ceremony, community building or activism, as they respond to the challenges of colonialism and the environmental crisis.

Panelists:

  • Trevor Herriot
  • Miriam Körner
  • Marjorie Beaucage
  • Melissa Arcand

Facilitator:

  • Candace Savage

Break 2:30 PM - 3:00 PM

3:00 PM - 3:15 PM

Technology Meets Communications – Open Space Wrap Up

Indigo Room

3:15 PM - 4:15 PM

Closing Keynote: Steven Rayan

Indigo Room

Steven Rayan (PhD Oxford 2011, he/him) serves as the Founding Director of the University of Saskatchewan’s quantum research centre (quanTA), in parallel to his roles as Professor of Mathematics and Director of Interdisciplinary Programming at the university. His research focuses on both the theory and practical elements of quantum science. He is the recipient of several research and teaching prizes, and has delivered nearly 100 invited talks in the past 15 years, including a 2023 TEDx talk titled "Quantum Magic: Using Mathematics and Art to Make the Impossible Possible". Over the past 5 years, he has collaborated closely with artists to find new ways to tell quantum stories to the world.

6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Networking Event

9Mile Legacy microbrewery

(402 21st Street W)

Register Here

CASC and SWCC delegates have one more option to meet up in Saskatoon. Join us at 9Mile Legacy micro-brewery for a founders' tour and tasting with a dinner featuring Saskatchewan ingredients, catered in the taproom by neighbourhood favourite, Odd Couple Asian Restaurant and bar. Mingle, nosh, sample some beers, connect with colleagues, and be among the first to learn about some of 9 Mile Legacy's ambitious local collaborations planned in their new demonstration level fermentation lab, the LGCY: Innovation Hub. Must be 19 years of age or older to attend.



Tuesday May 7th: Post Conference Event

9:00 AM – 3:30 PM

A Day at Wanuskewin Heritage Park

Depart by Bus from the Alt Hotel

Register here!

Join us for a day at Wanuskewin Heritage Park in collaboration with the Canadian Association of Science Centres.  

Schedule

9:00 – 9:30 am: Transportation to Meewasin Northeast Swale. Box breakfast included.

9:30– 11:00 am: Exploring the Meewasin Northeast Swale

Meewasin, created ahead of its time, has been a steward of the river valley for over four decades, guided by a rare 100 year plan to support its mission to conserve, develop and educate. This tour will visit the Northeast Swale, one of Meewasin’s most recent sites for master plan execution that includes interpretation, resource management and trail infrastructure. The site reveals signs of human habitation over several centuries and features rich biodiversity and rare grasslands, one of the most imperiled ecosystems on the planet.

11:00 am – 12 pm: Lunch provided

12:00 – 12:30 pm: Transportation to Wanuskewin Heritage Park

12:30 – 3:30 pm: Learning on the land at Wanuskewin Heritage Park

Wanuskewin has been a gathering place for over 6,400 years, and continues to bring people from all backgrounds together. This visit will include two tours—a guided outside walk and our Tipi Teachings program. The guided walk will focus on the interactions between climate, grazing animals, and fire on the Canadian Prairies, the role these forces play in developing natural grasslands, and how Wanuskewin Heritage Park are utilizing these forces to protect, conserve, and enhance the natural landscape. The Tipi Teachings program will give participants a chance to set up a tipi together while we share the Plains Cree style tipi teachings gifted to Wanuskewin by Elder Mary Lee, and the life lessons that go along with each of the fifteen poles.


Address:

P.O. Box 75 Station A

Toronto, ON

M5W 1A2

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