Building Indigenous Relationships Workshop

A workshop on science writing in an age of reconciliation 

What turns First Nations off when approached by writers? 

Lack of knowledge of the communities and the people.

What can writers learn about relationships, collaborations & problem solving? 

The historic and current contexts of the communities and the people.

Action plans to build better relationships. 

Approaches, tools, knowledge reference material that are helpful, meaningful and practical.


We invite science writers and other writers to join us for a dynamic workshop that will cover ways journalists and communicators can start meaningful conversations and explore unconscious bias to frame their writing in a time of reconciliation.  Including interdisciplinary and Indigenous viewpoints is the starting point for generational positive change.

This is a unique opportunity to experience hands-on learning and gain more confidence in writing about issues that concern local First Nations groups. The event will take place overlooking the beautiful Victoria waterfront, on the traditional territories Lekwungen peoples, today represented by the Songhees and Xwsepsum (Esquimalt) Nations.

Participants of the workshop will put together a summary of points to be circulated to local science writers, and also to form the basis of a national position paper for development by SWCC.

This professional development event is endorsed by members of SWCC, Science Borealis, and Curiosity Collider.

November 17, 2018

9:00 am to 12:00 pm

1010 Langley Street, 3rd floor.. (Hakai Institute conference room)

Workshop Fee: $55 per person

Coffee, tea, and a light breakfast will be provided as part of the workshop fee. 

All participants are invited to an optional informal lunch at their own expense following the workshop.

If you have specific questions that you could like to see addressed in the workshop, please email them by November 10th to: shelley@m-inktechdocs.com

This event is made possible through in-kind support from Hakai Institute.


Workshop Presenters

Michelle Washington

Ahjechwut, my ancestral name is Siemthlut and I am known as Michelle Washington.  I was born and raised in the village of Tla’amin which is a Northern Coast Salish Nation.  I also have ancestral ties to Sechelt and Maori on my grandfather’s side and Klahoose and Sto:lo on my grandmother’s side.  I am so thankful to be raising my family in the beautiful homeland of the Lkwungen speaking people now known as Victoria.  I have completed studies in Public Sector Management and Aboriginal Governance at UVIC and have returned to continue studies in Anthropology.

Recent work includes managing the exhibition “Our Living Languages” for First Peoples’ Cultural Council at the Royal BC Museum.  Programming with the Office of Indigenous Affairs at UVIC and have also worked for my Nation and others in several capacities including Lands and Resources, Governance, Culture and Treaty for well over a decade.  I am also the liaison for a multi-year archaeology, anthropology and history field school project with Simon Fraser University and the University of Saskatchewan.

 

Lou-ann Neel

Gilakas’la, my name is Lou-ann Neel and I am from the Mamalilikulla and Kwagiulth people of the Kwakwaka’wakw Nation. My formal education is in public administration (Certificate in the Administration of Aboriginal Governments, and a Diploma in Public Sector Management from U-Vic) and I have been a practicing artist since age 14, so I also have a Bachelors Degree in Fine Arts from Emily Carr University of Art & Design.  In my professional career, I blend these two disciplines together to bring creative solutions to my work — from program management, policy writing, and strategic planning to community consultations and engagement. I have worked with both federal and provincial governments, and numerous urban Indigenous organizations throughout BC, and I am currently the Repatriation Specialist at the Royal BC Museum as part of the museum’s work to honour the Calls to Action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People, and other important reports.

REGISTER HERE

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