PROGRAM

SOLD OUT! REGISTRATION CLOSED

BUT IT'S NOT TOO LATE TO HOLD THE DATE FOR SWCC 2019

WINNIPEG, MAY 23-25

ON THE EDGE

April 12-April 15, Vancouver, BC


AT A GLANCE

Thursday, April 12, Science World

 Sessions & Onsite Tours

 Reception

8:30 am registration opens

Offsite Tours Start at Science World:

9:00 -1:15 TRIUMF & CDRD

9:30 -11:00 Department of Fisheries

9:30 - 4:30 Networking Lounge

10:00 - 2:30 #HowIScicomm, Video Booth

10:00 -11:00 Behind the Scenes Tour: Science World

10:00 - 12:00 Act Your Science

1:00 - 2:00 Behind the Scenes Tour: Science World

2:30 - 3:30 TRIUMF

3:30 - 4:30 Town Hall


7:00pm - 10:00pm 

SciComm Social

Cash Bar: This is a 19+ event. 

tickets available for non-delegates

Friday, April 13, SFU Harbour Centre

 Sessions

 Dine Around

8:00 Registration

8:30 - 10:00 Keynote: Oceans Conservation

10:00 - 4:45 Beakerhead Mini-course


10:00 - 4:45pm

Policy & Literacy: Canada 2067

Publishing Panel

Infographics: Worth a Thousand Words

Building a Sustainable World

Approaches to Teaching Scientists

Social Media Super Stars

Communicating Controversial Topics

Careers Beyond Journalist & Communication

Impact of SciComm on Public Perception

Bring Us Your Ethical Dilemmas.

Reservations at 6:30 pm

Burgoo changed to La Mezcaleria at 5:30

Nuba

Bao Bei changed to Sai Woo

Alibi Room changed to Steamworks

Guu

Forage

Adesso

Royal Dinette cancelled

Davie Dosa Co. 

Jang Mo Jib


Saturday, April 14, SFU Harbour 

Sessions

SWCC AGM

8:00 Registration

8:30 -10:00 Keynote: Medical Cannabis

10:00 - 4:45 pm

Science, Sexism and Storytelling

The Science of Communication™ Workshop (Abridged)

Ocean Science and Technology Projects

Science Online in Canada

Open Access Science Panel

Tri-Agency Plus CFI Research Communications Summit – Best Practices

Digital Tools for Science Communicators

Story Pitching Session

Parks Canada VR tours - Behind the Scenes

On Copyright, Ethics and Attribution


AGM 4:45 - 6:00 pm

Sunday, April 15, Vancouver

Sunday, April 15, Victoria

10:00 - 3:00 Snorkel Safari

Non-delegates also register for the snorkel safari

10:00 - 2:00 Royal BC Museum

Science Communications at the Epicentre

 Engaging Indigenous Communities

The Science Behind the Scenes at RBCM


THURSDAY APRIL 12

We are working with STAN (Science and Technology Awareness Networks) and Science World on this great event at TELUS World of Science!


Science World British Columbia is a charitable organization that engages British Columbians in science and inspires future science and technology leadership throughout our province. Science World at TELUS World of Science, in Vancouver, provides children and families with access to cutting-edge, curriculum-linked galleries, films and hands-on educational programs. Our facility also houses the OMNIMAX® Theatre, featuring one of the largest dome screens in the world. These activities inspire the development of inquisitive minds and positive curiosities towards science and technology that lay the groundwork for a thriving, knowledge-based economy for British Columbia.



Canada’s Science and Technology Awareness Network (STAN) enhances the profile and influence of the science and technology education and public awareness sector. STAN is a member driven organization comprising of public and private sector institutions, including government ministries, school boards, corporations, museums, science centres and individuals. The Science and Technology Awareness Network exists to strengthen science and technology culture across Canada. STAN serves as a catalyst for like-minded individuals, institutions, and government agencies to facilitate communication and collaboration, and to focus the power of their collective capacity on increasing Canada’s global competitiveness in the knowledge economy.


Field Trips


TRIUMF & CDRD

9:00am - 1:15pm

TRIUMF: Canada's Particle Accelerator Centre

Powered by its complement of top talent and advanced accelerator infrastructure, TRIUMF is pushing the frontiers in isotope science and innovation, as well as technologies to address fundamental and applied problems in particle and nuclear physics, and the materials and life sciences. In collaboration with 20 Canadian universities, TRIUMF's diverse community of nearly 600 multidisciplinary researchers, engineers, technicians, tradespeople, staff, and students create a unique incubator for Canadian excellence, as well as a portal to premier global collaborations.


The Centre for Drug Research and Development (CDRD)

The Centre for Drug Research and Development (CDRD) is a global bridge that translates discoveries into innovative therapeutic products and improved health outcomes. CDRD works in collaboration with more than 50 affiliated universities and research institutes, 26 Canadian health sciences SMEs/entrepreneurs, six top global pharmaceutical companies, eight of the world’s leading translational research centres, and three patient-focused foundations.

Explore the world of drug research and development at CDRD’s award winning state-of-the-art headquarters. We will take you on the journey of ‘how fascinating research is converted into commercial products’ at Canada’s only national drug development and commercialization centre.

CDRD’s scientific infrastructure is comprised of 40,000 square feet of state-of-the-art facilities, equipment, and expertise, through six divisions that mirror the drug- development process — Target Validation, Screening, Medicinal Chemistry, Drug Delivery, Pharmacology/Toxicology and Biologics.

Questions from the groups are always encouraged!


SCIENCEWORLD

Behind the Scenes at Science World

10:00-11:00 AND 1:00-2:00 - BEHIND THE SCENES TOUR OF TELUS WORLD OF SCIENCE (meet outside of the Exploration Lab 5 minutes before start of tour, 1st Floor)

Experience BC’s iconic science centre located in one of Vancouver’s most recognizable buildings. This tour will take you behind the scenes from green roof to the exhibits team workshop and an introduction to the new Tinkering Gallery presented by Worksafe BC. There will also be time for exploration of the current feature exhibition: Ripley’s Believe it or Not. Two tours offered one in the morning, and one in the afternoon. There is no additional fee but you will have to register for a specific tour.


Delegate Activities at Science World


Networking Lounge: 9:30am - 4:30pm

Exploration Lab


Act your Science – Interactive Improvisation Training

10:00 am - 12:00 pm Innovation Lab

Come and share a taste of a communication program developed by Jeff Dunn, in collaboration with SWCC, the Loose  Moose Theatre in Calgary and the University of Calgary. The goal of this presentation is to provide a taste of how improvisation can be used to improve communication skills in science fields. This hands-on exercise will help participants build capacity to communicate science to various audiences by learning how to fail gracefully in public (to help reduce presentation anxiety), how to connect with your audience and how to recognize and use status in personal interactions.

The full program is 10hrs of training, in this shorter session, we will sample the program in a fun interactive environment. Be prepared to release your inner thespian. Space is limited to 20 people

Jeff Dunn has been a research scientist in brain and imaging for over 30 years. He has a strong interest in mentoring science trainees to broaden their career skills and has recently been developing programs to improve science communication. One class, gaining traction, is “Act your Science”, a custom designed course using improvisation to improving science communication skills for science trainees. He is an alumni of the Banff Science Communication program where he first experienced improvisation training for science. He has held a Canada Research Chair and has Directed the Experimental Imaging Centre at the University of Calgary since 2004. He has over 150 science publications in diverse journals ranging from Polar Biology to the Journal of Neurotrauma. He has supervised scores of graduate students and taught on subjects including MRI, optical imaging and brain physiology at altitude. His imaging research currently includes multiple sclerosis, brain cancer and concussion.

Video Booth: How I SciComm - go ahead and tell all, we want to know! 

 Available 10:am - 2:30pm: Exploration Lab

A camera team will be on hand to help you record and upload your 1 minute video about who you are, and how you do your science communications. Here are some questions for you to think about: 

1. Who are you?

2. How do you do your science communications?

3. What's your favourite science trivia? What's something cool you learned when researching a storyWhat's your favourite jargon? What's a word you had to memorizing pronunciation or spelling for a story


A Community of Innovators: 50 Years of TRIUMF


2:30 -3:30 pm  Science Theatre




 

Ask TRIUMF’s spirited founders and emeriti about the humble beginnings of Canada’s particle accelerator centre and you will invariably hear: “This used to be just a big pile of dirt.” You could imagine TRIUMF’s founding members five decades ago standing at the edge of the empty lot nestled between the forest and the sea, contemplating possibilities. But not even TRIUMF’s founders could have imagined the twists and turns of the lab’s 50-year journey, nor the impact that the lab would have on the people of Canada and the world.

Today, on that same 12.8-acre plot of land, TRIUMF houses world-leading research and technology, and fuels Canada’s collective imagination for the future of particle and nuclear physics and accelerator science. Join TRIUMF’s Director Jonathan Bagger and colleagues for an exploration of the lab’s origins, impacts, and possibilities – a story of collaboration that over five decades celebrates a multifaceted community and growing family of 20 Canadian member universities and partners from around the world. As the group dives into past, present, and future, you’ll notice a unifying thread: much depends on young people.

www.triumf50.com  @TRIUMFlab


Town Hall

How I Scicomm: Mapping the new frontiers of science communication in Canada

3:30pm - 4:30pm Science Theatre

To remain a living, growing organization, SWCC recognizes the need for a good understanding of the science communication landscape in Canada. This event explores the diversity of science writing and communication activities on social media in Canada related to public engagement with science. A panel of science writers and communicators will talk about their experiences with public engagement, community building, professional support, and ethics.  Early findings from a study conducted with researchers from Simon Fraser University and the University of the Fraser Valley that maps the science writing and communication landscape in Canada will also be presented.  The session facilitator and SWCC President, Tim Lougheed will then invite audience member to talk briefly about their needs from SWCC and what they are most proud about in relation to their work to engage publics online.

Session Facilitator: Tim Lougheed, SWCC President

A full time freelance writer and editor since 1991, Tim Lougheed has written hundreds of articles for specialized and general publications in Canada as well as internationally. He also edits Canadian Chemical News, a magazine published by the Chemical Institute of Canada.

He is the current president of the Science Writers and Communicators of Canada, a national organization with more than 600 members across the country. His career began as a reporter with the Windsor Star and the Sault Star, then as a science writer for Queen’s University. He has degrees from the University of Western Ontario, University of Toronto, and Queen’s University.

Panellists:

Samantha Yammie, @science.sam

Kurtis Baute, the Scope of Science blog and Brain Boost Education

Ami Kingdon, Hakai Magazine

Theresa Lao, Science Borealis and Curiosity Collider

Germana Barata, Simon Fraser University

Alexandre Schiele, UQAM East Asia Observatory 



Samantha Yammine

Samantha is a Science Communicator and PhD Candidate at the University of Toronto. She studies how stem cells build and maintain the brain, and shares daily updates from her research lab through social media. She goes by the nickname @science.sam on Instagram (one of the most quickly growing social platforms), where she is one of the largest accounts by a biologist.
This modern approach to science communication emphasizes storytelling, and friendly, 2-way discussions about science, and has started several scicomm and social campaigns including #ScienceSunday, #SkipBenefitNotClass, and #ScientistsWhoSelfie. Sam tweets about science communication from @SamanthaZY, and you can learn more about her at heysciencesam.com.

Germana Barata

Germana Barata is a visiting faculty member at Simon Fraser University (SFU), Canada, and is a researcher in science communication at the Laboratory of Advanced Studies in Journalism (Labjor), Centre for the Development of Creativity (Nudecri) at the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), in Brazil. She has a PhD in History of Science from the University of Sao Paulo (USP) in Brazil and has worked with science communication and altmetrics as a way to measure the social impact of science on social media. She is currently working on mapping science communicators and writers in Canada focusing on the new landscape on social media.@germanabarata

Theresa Liao

Theresa Liao is the Community Outreach Manager and Tech Lead for Science Borealis, a not-for-profit Canadian Science Blogging network. She works closely with the Science Borealis team to engage and promote Canadian scientists and science communicators through various online channels: social media, online newsletter, and website. Some highlights include the #CdnSciFav (in collaboration with SWCC) and #SciBorSelfies campaigns. She has served as a core team member for Science Borealis since 2012.

Theresa works full-time as the Communications Coordinator for the Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of British Columbia. She also co-founded the Curiosity Collider Art-Science Foundation, a Vancouver-based non-profit organization. She is an alumnus of the Banff Science Communications Program, and has more than 10 years of experience in science outreach and communication. Before her Science Communication career, she studied biochemistry and did research about Type 1 Diabetes for her Master’s degree. 

Alexandre Schiele

Alexandre Schiele, Ph. D. (Communication science, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 2017) is a researcher at the UQAM East Asia Observatory and the former General Coordinator of the Observatory (2011-2016). Previously, he worked as a research assistant at the Interuniversity Research Center on Science and Technology (IRCST) at the University of Quebec at Montreal (UQAM). He wrote the report Les observatoires de l’enseignement supérieur (Higher education observatories) (2008), and cosigned Science Communication in Canada: An inventory of the major PCST initiatives carried out in Canada (2011) a report for the Korean Foundation for the Advancement of Science and Creativity (KOFAC). Among his latest communications, are Pseudoscience Communication in Mass Media (2016), PCST international conference (Istanbul, Turkey), and Legalism, State Rationalization Project (2016), International conference on Chinese Classical Thought and Contemporary Politics (Paris, France). Among his publications, of particular interest are Science What? What Concepts are we using? An analysis of official conceptsScience&You (2015), University of Lorraine ; China’s International Attitude of Withdrawal during the 19th Century (2015) Geopolitics, History and International Relations ; and Pu Songling’s All Too Human Surreal Worlds : A Study of the Narrative Structures of Pu Songling’s Supernatural Short Stories (2014), Comparative Literature – East and West


Amorina Kingdon

Amorina Kingdon has been the staff writer and researcher for Hakai Magazine, an entirely online publication, since 2015. In 2017, she won the National Magazine Award for Best New Magazine Writer. Previously, she worked as a science writer with the University of Victoria, helping translate climate science via media and white papers, and she spent four years with the Science Media Centre of Canada, working to connect journalists with scientific experts. She has a degree in biology, and enjoys reading, running, good food, and being outside.

Kurtis Baute

I’ve often been described as “whimsical” and “energetic”, and Science is what gets me hyped up more than anything else. I run the YouTube channel The Scope of Science, where I use crazy metaphors to demonstrate scientific concepts. For example, I recently set-up 13,799 dominoes as a continuous time-line and then, as they were falling over, I did my best to narrate the history of the universe. 
Before I was knee-deep in homemade dominoes, I spent a few years as a science educator at BrainBoost and at Science World in Vancouver, and before that I did a M.Sc at the University of Guelph. I’m currently conducting a sort of experiment of my own: if I spend one year working full-time on YouTube videos, can I grow my channel to the point where I can sustain it as a full-time job? We’ll find out soon. For science!


 SciComm Social at Science World

7:00pm - 10:00pm

doors open at 7:00 stage performances start at 7:30

THIS IS A 19+ EVENT


SciComm Shenanigans: Power Point karaoke

7:30pm Science Theatre

Ever felt like you were dying a slow painful death by Power Point? At Power Point karaoke we turn tragedy into comedy for some killer laughs. Volunteer members of the audience treat us to a presentation with irreproducible results. Hosts provide a short deck of randomly selected power point slides that the volunteer presenter has never seen before. Voila. It’s flying by the seat of the pants improvised wacky science [fiction]. Join us!


Lesley Evans Ogden

Lesley Evans Ogden is a freelance science journalist based in the burbs of Vancouver. She writes mainly about living things but also long dead ones.  Beyond beats of ecology, conservation, quirky animal behaviour and environmental health she explores the intersection of science, human rights, policy, and the challenges of freelancing. Lesley leapt from scientist to science journalist after wading through Fraser Delta mud studying shorebirds and trudging pre-dawn up Vancouver’s North Shore mountains to study songbirds. Along the way, she acquired a PhD (SFU), postdoc (UBC) and completed Science Communications and Investigative Journalism programs at the Banff Centre. Lesley is always on the lookout for new venues to write or produce for. Her clients include Natural History, BioScience, New Scientist, Scientific American, Mosaic, Storyboard, BBC, Science, Nature, CBC, Undark, Science News and others. Still a bird nerd, she sometimes writes with a budgerigar on her shoulder. @ljevanso 


Jared Stang 

Jared Stang is a physicist, physics educator, and science communicator. As a Lecturer in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of British Columbia, he teaches large introductory physics courses and does research to understand how students learn physics and how we can teach it better. His past training is in theoretical physics, string theory, and physics education. Outside of the university, Jared enjoys creating wonder and delight about physics. He has honed his communication skills at the Banff Science Communications Workshop, the Beakerhead Science Communications School, and through improv classes.@StangJared


Marcello Pavan

Marcello Pavan started as a science communicator at about 10 years old, when he read cool stuff in  the encyclopedias after school and told his friends about it next recess.  Despite protestations from his (captive) audiences over the years, he kept this behaviour up through his schooling in Trail, B.C.,  his PhD in nuclear physics at UBC, and his post-docs at MIT and TRIUMF, until he found himself actually getting paid for it at TRIUMF since about 2004 and at UBC teaching first-year physics since 2011. He is now Academic Engagement director at TRIUMF, doing a little of this and a lot of that.  Along the way he (barely)  survived the inaugural SciComm school at Banff in 2006, got married, and had two beautiful boys, who have not (yet) told daddy to shut up about the stuff he read on the internet the previous evening.


 Curiosity Collider

What happens when art and science collide? Come to this event, check out Curiosity Collider and find out! Be giardia for a moment and get your photo in our giardia tintamarresque, experience data sonification and dance inspired and performed by artists and scientists, and support local #sciart at our art-science silent auction


Curiosity Collider Art-Science Foundation

Curiosity Collider Art-Science Foundation is a registered Vancouver-based non-profit. Our grassroots organization establishes and maintains an open forum that promotes interdisciplinary curiosity, and innovative ways to experience science.  We provide a creative connection for science and technology, visual and performing arts, culture and community, education, and public interests.  We foster a growing community by providing resources, events, and functions for continued multidisciplinary discussion and interaction.

Science Slam

Our only two rules? Five minute slams, and no slideshows allowed! And since no event is complete without judgment, we draft judges from top research and communication institutions to decide who will take away the title of Science Slam champion.

Science Slam Canada is a non-profit organization committed to supporting science communicators in communities across Canada. Through our network of volunteers and partner organizations, we run Science Slams that bring together researchers, students, educators, and communicators to share their science in a unique way. Whether it's a talk, a poem, a song, a dance, or something completely unexpected, the possibilities are endless. 



FRIDAY, APRIL 13 

at SFU Harbour Centre

Simon Fraser University opened its Harbour Centre campus in 1989. As BC’s first urban campus, it marked a new era in post-secondary education. Situated in the heart of downtown Vancouver, Harbour Centre offers a variety of meeting, classroom, reception and laboratory spaces. 


Morning Keynote: Oceans

8:30 Room 1900 Fletcher Theatre


Moderator: 

Adrienne Mason, Hakai Magazine

Hakai Magazine explores science, society, and the environment from a coastal perspective. 


Adrienne Mason is the managing editor of Hakai Magazine, an online publication that tells stories of science and society in coastal ecosystems. She has a BSc in biology and has worked as a biologist and/or marine educator for various organizations, including the Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre. In 2006, she helped launch KNOW, a Canadian science magazine for children, and was its managing editor for six years.


Panelists: 


Pete Ross

Dr. Peter S. Ross is the Vice-President of Research at Ocean Wise, an initiative of the Vancouver Aquarium. He holds an Adjunct Professor position at the University of Victoria, and served as a Research Scientist with the Canadian government between 1996 and 2013. He is an authority on marine pollution in Canada, having published over 150 scientific articles and book chapters, with a focus on the source, transport, fate and effects of priority pollutants. He launched the Ocean Pollution Research Program at Ocean Wise in 2014, and continues to lead a solution-oriented microplastic pollution research program.



Andrew Trites

Dr. Andrew Trites, faculty at UBCs Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries 

Dr. Andrew Trites is a Professor and Director of the Marine Mammal Research Unit in the Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries at the University of British Columbia. He studies marine mammals in the North Pacific, and leads a research program that spans the fields of nutrition, ecology, physiology, behavior, anthropology and oceanography. His research furthers the conservation and understanding of marine mammals, and helps resolve conflicts between people and marine mammals.  He has published over 250 research papers and has served on many advisory committees and independent panels. He led the Blue Whale Project to display the world’s largest freely suspended skeleton, and shares his passion for science communication through teaching communication skills to undergraduate students, and hosting an annual marine mammal symposium that invites the world to watch and ask questions on line about research and conservation initiatives led by British Columbians.



Jody Wright

Dr. Jody Wright, Director of Communications & Engagement at Clear Seas


Jody is a marine ecologist by training, now working in science communications as the Director of Communications & Engagement at Clear Seas Centre for Responsible Marine Shipping.



Isabelle Côté 

Isabelle Côté is a professor of Marine Ecology in the Department of Biological Sciences at Simon Fraser University. Her interests in marine ecology and conservation are broad. Her recent research focus has been on marine invasive species – measuring their impacts, predicting their spread and devising the best ways to control them. Although much of her work is on tropical habitats, she is also involved in subtotal ecological research on the coast of British Columbia, with projects on invasive crabs and eelgrass resilience. She is passionate about science communication, particularly relating to ocean discovery, and is the Vice-President of the Canadian Society for Ecology and Evolution. She was awarded the Marsh Award for Conservation Biology of the Zoological Society of London, for contributions of fundamental science to the conservation of animal species and habitats, and selected as a Leopold Leadership Fellowin 2015.@redlipblenny, https://tmel.wordpress.com/




Breakout Sessions


Frontiers in SciComm Policy & Practice

Canada 2067 – Building a national vision for STEM learning

10:30 Room 1900


Canada 2067 is an ambitious initiative to develop a national vision and goals for youth learning in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). Significant and scalable changes in education can be achieved by aligning efforts towards shared goals that support all children and youth in Canada.  A draft framework has been developed that builds on research into global policy, broad-based public input, five youth summits, consultation with millennials and a national leadership conference. It calls for action by diverse stakeholders including students, educators, parents, community organizations, industry and all levels of governments.  In this workshop, participants will learn about the initiative and discuss the inherent challenges of catalyzing education change in Canada. Participants will also review the framework and provide feedback that will be incorporated into the final version of the Canada 2067 framework. Input into the design of phase 2 will also be encouraged.

Bonnie Schmidt, C.M., Ph.D.

Founder and President, Let’s Talk Science


Dr. Bonnie Schmidt is the founder and president of Let’s Talk Science, a national charitable organization that helps Canadian youth prepare for future careers and citizenship roles by supporting their engagement in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). Annually, Let’s Talk Science is accessed by more than 40% of schools in over 1,700 communities, impacting nearly 1 million youth. More than 3,500 volunteers at 45 post-secondary sites form our world-class outreach network. Bonnie currently serves as Chair of the National Leadership Taskforce on Education & Skills for the Information and Communications Technology Council (ICTC) and is on the Board of Governors of the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT). She was named a Member of the Order of Canada in 2015 and has received an Honorary Doctorate (Ryerson University), the Purvis Memorial Award (Chemical Institute of Canada), Community Service Award (Life Sciences Ontario), and a Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Award. @BMSchmidt


Publishing/Career Building

Publishing Panel 

10:30 Room 1600

Are you looking for advice on writing and publishing a popular-science book or science book for kids? Are you wondering what publishers are looking for in an initial pitch and what are some common mistakes? Come and join us for a discussion with professional science authors where we will be tackling these questions. We will also explore writing tips for success, gauging your audience, and how to monetize your efforts.

Moderator

Lesley Evans Ogden

Lesley Evans Ogden is a freelance science journalist based in the burbs of Vancouver. She writes mainly about living things but also long dead ones.  Beyond beats of ecology, conservation, quirky animal behaviour and environmental health she explores the intersection of science, human rights, policy, and the challenges of freelancing. Lesley leapt from scientist to science journalist after wading through Fraser Delta mud studying shorebirds and trudging pre-dawn up Vancouver’s North Shore mountains to study songbirds. Along the way, she acquired a PhD (SFU), postdoc (UBC) and completed Science Communications and Investigative Journalism programs at the Banff Centre. Lesley is always on the lookout for new venues to write or produce for. Her clients include Natural History, BioScience, New Scientist, Scientific American, Mosaic, Storyboard, BBC, Science, Nature, CBC, Undark, Science News and others. Still a bird nerd, she sometimes writes with a budgerigar on her shoulder. @ljevanso

Panelists

Mark L. Winston

Mark L. Winston is the recipient of the 2015 Governor General’s Literary Award for Nonfiction for his book Bee Time: Lessons From the Hive. One of the world’s leading experts on bees and pollination, Dr. Winston is also an internationally recognized researcher, teacher and writer. He directed Simon Fraser University’s Centre for Dialogue for 12 years, where he founded the Centre’s Semester in Dialogue, a program that creates leadership development opportunities that equip and empower students contribute to social change in communities.

As a consultant and thought leader, Dr. Winston partners with universities, corporations, NGOs, governments and communities to advance communication skills, engage public audiences with controversial issues through dialogue, and implement experiential learning and community engagement in educational institutions. As an award-winning writer and editor, he works with students, scientists, other professionals and writers to develop compelling non-fiction, from proposals and newspaper opinion pieces to manuscripts and books.

He currently is a Professor and Senior Fellow in Simon Fraser University’s Centre for Dialogue, and a Professor of Biological Sciences.

Christopher Pollon 

Christopher Pollon is a Vancouver-based freelance journalist covering business, environment, and the politics of natural resources -- with an interest in energy, mines and oceans.  His has written for National Geographic, The Walrus, VICE, The Globe and Mail, and The Tyee, where he has been a Contributing Editor since 2008. Christopher's first book, The Peace in Peril: The Real Cost of the Site C Dam (Harbour Publishing) was published in late 2016. @C_Pollon


Adrienne Mason

Before joining Hakai Magazine as managing editor, Adrienne Mason was a freelance writer and editor. She also helped launch KNOW: the science magazine for curious kids and was managing editor for six years. Adrienne writes for both adults and children and is the author of over 30 books, covering science, natural history, and the cultural history of the west coast. Her most recent book is Long Beach Wild, published by Greystone in 2012. Adrienne also owns Postelsia Press, a niche publisher that produces small runs of short books on topics specific to the west coast of Vancouver Island. @toughcitywriter


Professional Development

Infographics: Worth a Thousand Words with Kate Broadly and Sonya Odsen

1:15 Room 1520

Infographics have become a popular way to present results to non-specialist audiences, and they are a very effective tool for sharing science on social platforms. Infographics are more likely to be shared online, where they increase engagement with scientific content on platforms like Twitter.

No art skills? No problem! This session will guide you through the process of creating your own infographic, from crafting your story to telling that story visually, and will include strategies to design effective visuals without having to draw (unless you want to!). Topics will include developing your key messages, making your visuals functional rather than decorative, tips for giving your visuals a professional edge, and the best software options for each artistic skill level. Our goal is to empower you to create a visually-pleasing infographic regardless of your art or drawing experience. At the end of this active session, you will have a draft of your own unique infographic ready to be made digital.

The skills you develop during this session will be readily transferable to other visual media, such as talks, posters, or even creating visuals for blog posts.

Kate Broadley


Sonya Odsen

Kate Broadley and Sonya Odsen are Science Communicators with Fuse Consulting. Located in Edmonton, Alberta, Fuse is dedicated to communicating cutting-edge research to different audiences in creative and innovative ways. Their ultimate goal is to bring knowledge to life and empower audiences to apply that knowledge in policy, conservation, research, and their day-to-day lives. Every day, Kate and Sonya tackle complex topics and transform them for specific audiences through writing and design. Infographics are one of their favourite tools for conveying information in fun and accessible ways. Their past and current design projects include interpretive signage for Nature Conservancy Canada, twitter-optimized visual abstracts for the Applied Conservation Ecology lab at the University of Alberta, and a series of science-inspired holiday cards. You can see examples of their work at http://www.fuseconsulting.ca/see-our-work/. Kate and Sonya are also ecologists by training, each holding an M.Sc. from the University of Alberta.


Frontiers in SciComm Policy & Practice

How solutions made in BC are helping build a sustainable world

1:15 Room 1600

Imagine a world where you can harvest potable drinking water directly from the air, grow crops anywhere during any season, and live in smart cities that are run on renewable energy and surrounded by carbon-neutral buildings. These technologies are currently in development right here in British Columbia, placing the province on the map as a leader in cleantech. In this panel, join experts from the fields of energy, food, water and the built environment for a discussion on local innovations, academic research, industrial activities and policy implications that are addressing some of the planet’s most pressing issues.

Moderator

Kevin Oldknow 

Dr. Kevin Oldknow, P.Eng., is Associate Dean and Faculty Teaching Fellow in Simon Fraser University’s Faculty of Applied Sciences, and a Senior Lecturer in the School of Mechatronic Systems Engineering where he teaches dynamic systems modeling and simulation, industrial control systems, manufacturing systems, technology and society, engineering economics and technology entrepreneurship. He is also leading the launch of SFU’s new Sustainable Energy Engineering (SEE) program, the first of its kind in Western Canada, to provide students with an interdisciplinary education on engineering principles, design practices, technologies, economics and policies associated with the global cleantech sector. Oldknow has 20 years of industrial experience – primarily related to application of cleantech to transportation systems – and has held technical, strategic and senior management roles at Procter & Gamble, Cameleon Controls, Kelsan Technologies, Portec Rail Products and LB Foster Rail Technologies. As President of Oldknow Consulting Inc. he provides technical consulting services with a specialization in vehicle-track interaction. @FAS_SFU


Panelists:

Majid Bahrami 

Dr. Majid Bahrami, P.Eng, is a Professor in Simon Fraser University’s School of Mechatronic Systems Engineering and a Canada Research Chair in Alternative Energy Conversion Systems. His research group studies transport phenomena in emerging microstructured materials and porous media, fuel cell technologies, new refrigeration, and microelectronics cooling with a focus on sustainable energy conversion systems. This multifaceted research area requires combined expertise from heat transfer, fluid flow, material science, and contact mechanics and has a focus both on fundamentals and on contemporary industrial applications. Bahrami has authored/co-authored more than 80 publications and supervised more than 70 students in sustainability research. In 2016 he received Canada’s Clean50 award. In 2017 he received the Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Global Water Award from the UAE Water Foundation for his sustainable waste-heat driven hybrid atmospheric water generator (HAWgen). He is an ASME Fellow and a member AIAA, ASHRAE, SAE and CSME. @FAS_SFU


Shanna Knights 

Shanna Knights, P.Eng, is Director of Research at Ballard Power Systems, a world leader in thedevelopment, manufacture, sale and servicing of PEM hydrogen fuel cells. She leads activities to improve fuel cell cost and durability through both internal research and guiding significant Canadian and international academic, government, and industrial fuel cell collaborative efforts. Knights, a frequent keynote speaker at international conferences, holds several patents, and is an author on numerous scientific journal publications and book chapters. In 2017, she received the Engineers and Geoscientists BC’s highest honour, the R. A. McLachlan Memorial Award, for community service and significant technical and professional leadership. Ballard’s clean energy solutions bring compelling value propositions to end users in markets such as heavy duty motive, materials handling, critical infrastructure backup power, UAV and rail applications. We are working to accelerate fuel cell technology adoption, committed to sustainable mobility and clean air for everyone.@BallardPwr


Fiona Famulak

Fiona Famulak is the President of the Vancouver Regional Construction Association (VRCA) and a member of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Scotland. She is passionate about business and has over 25 years international experience, gained in Europe, Asia Pacific and Canada, working in the private and not-for-profit sectors. Famulak is passionately evolving the VRCA so that it is leading by example and inspiring to others as a future-focused, relevant and invaluable resource to the construction industry. The industry has a number of key milestones on its horizon, including the requirement to build carbon-neutral buildings by 2032 (and by 2025 in the City of Vancouver). It therefore needs to build faster, greener and more productively than ever before. As a former small business owner, Famulak understands that the application of best practice to all aspects of business will be critical to meeting this and other milestones.@VanConstruction


Educating Scientists/Reponsibilities to Communicate    

Approaches to Teaching Scientists Communication


1:15 Room 2270


There is an increasing trend of scientists becoming the communicators of their own research. However, the majority of science degrees lack any formal communication training and practical experience is often in the form of conference presentations to peers or academic papers. What resources are available to scientists seeking communication training? This panel will explore the design principles and motivations for training scientists and science students to be better communicators by hearing from the designers of four different training programs.

Moderator:

Alexandra Kasper, M. Sc.

Alexandra’s scientist training in the Integrated Science program at McMaster University emphasized communication as an often-forgotten step in the scientific method. Continuing to pursue a Master’s in physics at Simon Fraser University, she has integrated science outreach and communication into her career since the beginning and seeks out any opportunity to share her research and passion for science with curious minds. Alexandra is the community events coordinator for Let’s Talk Science at SFU, the program coordinator for Invent the Future, an Artificial Intelligence enrichment program for grade 11 girls run by SFU, and is the teaching assistant for SFU’s first science communication course for science students. She is also the winner of SFU’s 2017 Three Minute Thesis competition and Science Slam Canada’s mini slam during Science Literacy Week 2017. @AKSKasper


Panelists:



Dr. Claire Cupples

Dean, Faculty of Science

Professor of Molecular Biology & Biochemistry

Simon Fraser University

In her role as Dean, Dr. Cupples works with 8 science departments to set the strategic direction of the Faculty, oversees the budgeting process and represents the Faculty of Science within the larger university as a member of the administration of SFU and of the University Senate. SFU Science is renouned for its extensive science outreach programs centred on the Trottier Studio and on the Trottier Observatory and Science Courtyard.

Dr. Cupples received her BSc at the University of Victoria, her MSc at the University of Calgary and her PhD at York University.  After post-doctoral studies at UCLA she held academic and administrative positions at Concordia University, in Montreal, and at the University of Victoria. Her research focuses on the causes, consequences and prevention of mutations in microbes and in humans. Dr. Cupples has taught university courses in microbiology and molecular biology throughout her career. She currently sits on the boards of TRIUMF and the Telus World of Science.

Burke Cullen, Ph.D

Dr. Burke Cullen has been the lead developer of Seneca College’s Science Communication Summer Institute. It made its first launch last summer and remains a work-in- progress fueled by a dynamic faculty from academe and industry. Burke sees science communication as axiomatically metamorphic because of the continual collision of STEM and language, of visuals and imagination, and of humans’ hunger for science and the pursuant contest to enlighten them. Hence the pedagogy within the discipline of SciComm will always entail cutting-edge skills in the depiction and conceptualization of science topics through verbal and visual rhetoric as well as skills in its dissemination and mobilization through various new media. Burke grew  up in Cranbrook BC, completed an MA at UBC, wrote his UofT doctoral dissertation on BC fiction, and teaches a variety of communication courses in Seneca@York’s Faculty of Communication, Art, and Design and its Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering Technology.


Alan Shapiro, MSc


Alan Shapiro is a science communicator based in Vancouver, Canada. He is co-founder of LitScientist - a science communication training firm - and Science Slam Canada - a non-profit organization that runs science outreach events across the country. Through his work with LitScientist, Alan provides science communication training, content development, and communication strategy services for universities, research institutes, and technical firms. Alan holds a BSc in Environmental Earth Science from the University of Alberta and an MSc in Environmental Engineering from Columbia University. When not wearing his science communication hat, Alan works on water resource projects across Canada, including research, policy, and communication. @watercomm and @litscientist

Jennifer Gardy, PhD

Dr. Jennifer Gardy is both a scientist and a science communicator. In her scientific life, she’s a Senior Scientist in Genomics at the BC Centre for Disease Control and an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of British Columbia, where she holds a Canada Research Chair in Public Health Genomics. Jennifer’s lab uses genome sequencing to understand how infectious diseases spread in populations. When she’s not studying microbes, Jennifer works in science media. She regularly hosts episodes of CBC Television’s long-running science documentary series The Nature of Things and appears as a talking head on many other programs for networks including CTV, Discovery Channel, and History Television.  She wrote a children’s book about microbes for OwlKids Books in 2014, and regularly speaks to scientists about how to communicate their research effectively.@jennifergardy


Social Media Superstars

1:15 room 1900

David Shiffman, PhD

Dr. David Shiffman is a Liber Ero Postdoctoral Fellow at Simon Fraser University, where he studies the conservation of sharks. He is also an award-winning science communicator, with bylines in the Washington Post, Scientific American, Slate, and Gizmodo, as well as hundreds of interviews with outlets including the New York Times, National Public Radio, and CNN. He is the second most-followed marine biologist on twitter in the world, and one of the most-followed scientists on social media in British Columbia. He has taught hundreds of other scientists to use social media, and has published several peer-reviewed papers about using social media to communicate science. @WhySharksMatter

Samantha Yammine

Samantha is a Science Communicator and PhD Candidate at the University of Toronto. She studies how stem cells build and maintain the brain, and shares daily updates from her research lab through social media. She goes by the nickname @science.sam on Instagram (one of the most quickly growing social platforms), where she is one of the largest accounts by a biologist.
This modern approach to science communication emphasizes storytelling, and friendly, 2-way discussions about science, and has started several scicomm and social campaigns including #ScienceSunday, #SkipBenefitNotClass, and #ScientistsWhoSelfie. Sam tweets about science communication from @SamanthaZY, and you can learn more about her at heysciencesam.com.


Professional Development

Communicating Controversial Topics: An Interactive Workshop


3:15 Room 1520

Through group discussion, case studies, and hands-on activities, this workshop will provide attendees with a toolkit for communicating controversial topics. Specific topics will be chosen by the attendees, but could include true scientific controversies as well as topics that the general public may perceive as controversial. Content will help communicators: identify where the controversy lies and where the credibility lies, determine who the stakeholders are, identify the audience(s), research and present topics ethically, and choose the most appropriate media or channel for the topic. This workshop will be of interest to professional science journalists and science communicators, but will also offer strategies to science communication educators for incorporating controversial topics into classes including how to provide useful and appropriate formative feedback to learners.


Eric Jandciu

Eric leads and supports teaching and learning projects within the Faculty of Science. Working with faculty, educational technologists and students he is involved with the design, implementation, revision and evaluation of new courses, such as Communicating Science (SCIE 300), First-Year Seminar in Science (SCIE 113) and Introduction to Sustainability (SCIE 220/ASIC 220). Eric also frequently consults with faculty on implementing communication skills instruction into science courses and holds training workshops on this topic.


Meghan Aubé

Meghan has worked with science communication since 2012, when she came to UBC and joined a team of science and writing specialists at UBC working to develop a suite of support materials for science communications courses. In her over 15-year career in higher education, she has taught rhetoric and communication and film studies; and, after moving into administration has developed and overseen writing support programs for university students and currently works in educational program development.

Jaclyn Stewart

Jackie has taught general and organic chemistry at UBC since 2005. In 2011, she began teaching communicating science (SCIE 300) and recently helped plan the curriculum for an upcoming communicating chemistry course, which was first offered to students in 2015. She has a B.Sc. degree in chemistry, a M.Sc. in wood science, and a Ph.D. in educational psychology. Jackie’s research interests span the areas of self-regulated learning, problem solving, and assessment of learning. She is passionate about helping students learn through innovative instructional methods and by motivating them to use research-tested study techniques. Jackie received the UBC Killam Prize for Excellent in Teaching in 2006 and 2010, as well as the UBC Science Undergraduate Society Teaching Excellence Award in 2010.


Publishing/Career Building

Alternative science communication careers: Beyond journalist and communications officer

3:15 Room 1600

Not all science writers fall into the categories of journalist and organizational communications officer. Outside of these traditional categories, many opportunities exist for exciting, rewarding work that requires the skills of a science writer. This session is all about how you can get clients to pay you for writing about science and technology by thinking slightly outside the box. This session will cover alternative science writing jobs and tasks in the digital world and related to industry.

Panelists will discuss:
- Where do you find these kinds of jobs and assignments?
- What compensation can you expect?
- What skill sets and specializations get you ahead in these jobs?
- Can growing your own online audience result in getting paid?

Moderator
Kristina Campbell, @bykriscampbell

Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.) covers microbiome science for online and print media. She is author of The Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook (Rockridge Press, 2016) and co-author of an academic textbook, Gut Microbiota: Interactive Effects on Nutrition and Health (Elsevier, 2018). A practiced liason between scientists and industry, she writes, consults, and works with scientific advisory boards for microbiome-related organizations in Europe and North America.

Panelist
Mika McKinnon @mikamckinnon

Mika McKinnon is a freelance scientist, taking gigs that focus on being excited and curious in public. She's a science communicator with bylines in io9, BBC, New Scientist, Racked, and others, but she also takes that science into fiction, scrawling equations for Stargate or helping Madam Secretary root its plots in real research. When not lurking around set, she tromps around in the mud with high-voltage geophysical equipment scaring bears, or investigates all the ways the planet is trying to murder us.

Panelist
Josh Silberg @joshsilberg

Josh Silberg has researched everything from humpback whales to whale sharks to rockfish—he just couldn’t decide on one creature to study. After earning a Master’s of Resource and Environmental Management from Simon Fraser University, he joined the British Columbia-based Hakai Institute as the Science Communications Coordinator. Now, he gets to share all sorts of coastal science stories through blogs, videos, infographics, and the occasional poem. In his free time, he can be found photographing wildlife, hiking, or searching for creatures in tide pools. 


Panelist
Shelley McIvor

A former analytical chemist, Shelley is a technical writer and communications consultant who specializes in designing content that is relevant, memorable and accessible. Her company specializes in marine applications with audiences and clients that range from non-profits to government, encompassing both the public and private sectors. She brings a wealth of cross-cultural experiences to her projects, exploring different ways to communicate complex technical information that highlight the fascinating human side of [mis]communication.


Impact of SciComm on Public Perception & Policy AI

3:15 Room 2270

The world is talking about Artificial Intelligence (AI) - but can we believe everything we hear? AI researcher Angelica Lim and science journalist Mićo Tatalović will start with a look at how AI research news is communicated and the impact on society’s view of this new technology. Public attitudes towards AI are already shaping policy around the world concerning human rights, traffics laws, and robotics. We will ​explore​ case studies of when the story wasn’t quite right, and the potential implications of a misrepresentation of AI in the media. How can researchers and communicators work together to keep the public informed? We will tackle this broader question by facilitating a group collaboration to create a practical guide on ways to strengthen the communication between experts and communicators. Are you a topic expert, writer, or communicate in any field of science or technology​? Join our discussion!




Angelica Lim, PhD

Dr. Angelica Lim is an Assistant Professor of Professional Practice in Computing Science at Simon Fraser University (SFU) in Canada, who has studied and worked in robotics for over 10 years in Canada, France and Japan. As director of the SFU Rosie Lab, her current research focuses on building robots with social intelligence and empathy, particularly using affective and developmental robotics paradigms. Before that, she spent 4 years as a Software Engineering Manager at SoftBank Robotics in Paris, where she led the emotion recognition team for Pepper the humanoid robot. She has been featured on the BBC, given talks at SXSW and TEDx, hosted a TV documentary on robotics, and was recently featured in Forbes 20 Leading Women in AI. She has spoken to policy makers at the EU Commission in Brussels, as well as the Canada2020 conference in Ottawa. She was also previously a contributing writer for IEEE Spectrum Automaton blog, MIT Technology Review, Footnote and Berkeley's Greater Good blog. She is a native of Vancouver, with a B.Sc. in Computing Science from SFU and a Ph.D. and Masters from Kyoto University, Japan.


Mico Tatalovic

Mićo Tatalović is editor of New Scientist’s environment and life sciences news section. A native of Croatia, he is now based in London, overseeing a team of staff writers and freelancers. He previously worked on the news desk of SciDev.net, helping to coordinate a global network of science journalists reporting from South America, Africa, and Asia, as well as freelancing for wide range of science magazines. He is chairman of the Association of British Science Writers, and sits on the board of the Balkan Network of Science Writers.  @MTatalovic



Professional Development


Emerging topics in SciComm Ethics: Bring us your ethical dilemmas


3:15 room 1900


Science writers and communicators are known for their adeptness at explaining complex technical ideas, but the job also presents its share of human situations where the correct course of action is not always clear. This year, SWCC invites conference registrants to send in a question or ethical dilemmas relating to best practices in the field. From dealing with sources, to conflicts of interest and more, the questions will be taken up by panelists during a special session on ethics and science writing and communications at the conference. (Authorship of questions will be considered anonymous unless otherwise specified.)

Panelists

Ivan Semeniuk is an award winning science journalist with Canada's national newspaper, The Globe and Mail.  A life-long communicator of scientific discoveries and ideas, he has worked in print and broadcast media for over 20 years and his stories have informed Canadians about topics as diverse as space exploration, genetic engineering and climate change. Prior to joining The Globe and Mail in 2013, he was the Washington-based chief of correspondents for the journal Nature, U.S. bureau chief for New Scientist magazine and producer and columnist with Discovery Channel’s Daily Planet

Mark L. Winston is the recipient of the 2015 Governor General’s Literary Award for Nonfiction for his book Bee Time: Lessons From the Hive. One of the world’s leading experts on bees and pollination, Dr. Winston is also an internationally recognized researcher, teacher and writer. He directed Simon Fraser University’s Centre for Dialogue for 12 years, where he founded the Centre’s Semester in Dialogue, a program that creates leadership development opportunities that equip and empower students contribute to social change in communities.As a consultant and thought leader, Dr. Winston partners with universities, corporations, NGOs, governments and communities to advance communication skills, engage public audiences with controversial issues through dialogue, and implement experiential learning and community engagement in educational institutions. As an award-winning writer and editor, he works with students, scientists, other professionals and writers to develop compelling non-fiction, from proposals and newspaper opinion pieces to manuscripts and books. He currently is a Professor and Senior Fellow in Simon Fraser University’s Centre for Dialogue, and a Professor of Biological Sciences.

Dr Bubela is Professor and Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences at Simon Fraser University. Previously she was a Professor in the School of Public Health and Adjunct Professor in the Alberta School of Business at the University of Alberta, Canada. She holds a PhD in biology from the University of Sydney and a JD from the University of Alberta. She joined the faculty of the U Alberta in 2004 after clerking for The Honourable Louise Arbour at the Supreme Court of Canada, articling at Field Law LLP in Edmonton, and being called to the bar (Law Society of Alberta) in 2005.   Her research program in intellectual property and health law related to translational biomedical research brings together her legal training and a PhD in biology and expertise in genetics and molecular biology. Her research program focuses on large collaborative science networks in genomics, gene therapy, and stem cell biology, addressing barriers to the effective translation of new technologies. These are varied and include ethical issues, effective communication of risks and benefits among stakeholder groups, commercialization and regulation. She provides advice for Government Health and Science agencies as well as life sciences research communities, and patient organisations. Her research is funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Canadian Stem Cell Network, Genome Canada, and Alberta Innovates, among others. She co-leads the PACEOMICS program on the development of cost-effective personalized medicine and the Alberta Ocular Gene Therapy Team, which is developing novel gene therapies and conducting a phase I clinical trial of the NighstaRx AAV2-REP1 product for choroideremia. She has over a hundred publications in law, ethics and science policy journals including Nature, Nature Biotechnology, Cell Stem Cell, PLoS Biology, Trends in Biotechnology, American Journal of Bioethics and Science Translational Medicine.


Beakerhead Mini-Course



Friday, April 13


10:00am - 4:45 pm Room 2200

You’ve been curious about the Banff Science Communications program but have not had the time or money to attend — yet. Here’s your chance to taste the best of Banff in a one-day program tailored for this conference. Spend a day with the program’s founding faculty: leave the conference with a spring in your step and ideas for engaging mainstream audiences. Banff alum are welcome too for a booster shot! Brought to you by Beakerhead, the annual smash-up of art, science and engineering. Biology bit: Beakerhead was incubated in Banff and now offers the made-in-Banff science communications training across the country. Yep, the offspring ate its mother.  Learn more

Note: Space is limited, and will be available on a first come basis. 10:00 am - 4:00 pm. There is a fee of $500 (includes conference day rate, including morning keynote and meals) for this event. Full conference delegates receive a discount equal to the day rate. 


Dine Around

Friday, April 13

Last year's event at various restaurants in Gatineau got such high ratings that we're repeating it with downtown restaurants in Vancouver. Here is how it works. Our Vancouver members handpick some great restaurants within walking distance of the SFU Harbour Centre in different price ranges and book them for 8 people. You pick your restaurant when you register and then on lucky Friday the 13th you'll be dining with 7 other random delegates who also picked that same restaurant. This is a pay as you go event. 

Burgoo Changed to La Mezcaleria

http://www.lamezcaleria.ca/dinner/


Nuba

Lebanese 

Gastown Location



Bao Bei Changed to Sai Woo


Alibi Room Changed to Steamworks


Guu

Japanese

Guu with Otokomae, Gastown 


Forage

Pacific Northwest Local



Adesso

Italian



Royal Dinette Cancelled


Davie Dosa Co. 

South Indian



Jang Mo Jib

Korean


Saturday April 14, 2018


Morning Keynote: Cannabis


8:30 Room 1900 Fletcher Theatre


Moderator

Moderator: Amanda Siebert

Amanda Siebert is an award-winning journalist and photographer, currently filling the role of cannabis editor at the Georgia Straight, Vancouver’s longest-running urban weekly newspaper and one of the city’s oldest supporters of cannabis legalization. As things go in the burgeoning cannabis scene, her main focus as of late has been on news and events, but she’s passionate about giving voice to people and patients that have been unfairly stigmatized by the prohibition of cannabis, and eager to lend support to individuals both in the community and across Canada who are working to build an inclusive and supportive industry for all. Amanda is also currently writing a book with a Vancouver-based publishing company, called The Little Book of Cannabis: How Marijuana can Improve Your Life, due for release in late 2018. @amanda_siebert



Panelists 


Dr. Terry Lake


Terry Lake is the Vice President of Corporate Social Responsibility for Hydropothecary Corporation, a licensed producer of medical cannabis in Gatineau Quebec. Before returning to the private sector, Terry served as a member of the BC Legislature for Kamloops with appointments as Environment Minister and Health Minister. He was Mayor of Kamloops and an instructor of Animal Health Technology at Thompson Rivers University. Prior to his career as a veterinarian, Terry was a broadcast journalist in Alberta working for Broadcast News, a division of Canadian Press. Lake was awarded Canada’s Public Health Hero Award by the Canadian Public Health Association for his ground breaking harm reduction initiatives launched in the face of BC’s opioid epidemic. He maintains a keen interest in public health and is an advocate of exploring the use of cannabis as a substitute for opioids and other substances.

  


Dr. Jenna Valleriani is a Strategic Advisor for Canadian Students for Sensible Drug Policy and a Post Doctoral Fellow at the BC Centre on Substance Use in the Qualitative and Community Based Research Program. Her research focuses on cannabis, policy and vulnerable populations. Her past work at the University of Toronto looked at legal and illegal cannabis markets in Canada, particularly the role of social movements and entrepreneurship in an emerging legal cannabis industry. In the past, Jenna also designed and instructed a fourth year seminar at the University of Toronto titled, "Marijuana Policy in the 21st Century". Jenna recently led the development of a sensible youth cannabis education toolkit and youth workshops on cannabis legalization. Her public commentary on cannabis policy in Canada has been featured in the Globe and Mail, the Ottawa Citizen, the Huffington Post, as well as CBC's "Power and Politics".


Jonathan Page

Jonathan Page is the co-founder and CEO of Anandia Labs, a leading cannabis testing and genetics company based in Vancouver, and an Adjunct Professor at the University of British Columbia. He has spent his career deciphering the genetic and biochemical secrets of medicinal plants, including the production of THC and other cannabinoids in cannabis. He received his BSc (hons) and PhD from the University of British Columbia, undertook postdoctoral training at the University of Munich, and worked as a group leader at the Leibniz Institute of Plant Biochemistry. He directed a lab at the National Research Council’s Plant Biotechnology Institute from 2003-2013. In 2010, Jonathan co-led the Canadian team that reported the first sequence of the cannabis genome. He lectures widely on cannabis science and contributes to policy discussions regarding medical cannabis and legalization.

Breakout Sessions

THE SCIENCE OF COMMUNICATION™ WORKSHOP (Abridged)

10:30 Room 1900

Do you find it difficult to communicate with your audience and explain how your research and technology can help them?

According to the Trust Barometer, an annual international trust survey, only 41% of people trust scientists and engineers. With this low level of trust, it is critical that you are able to present information clearly and meaningfully by bringing alive your technical data.  

This session, which is adapted from a full-day training course, will help you analyze your audience and understand their background, knowledge base and interests, so that you can create content and develop tools to effectively deliver complex information to non-technical audiences. In this session, you will also learn how to gain trust and credibility of all your stakeholders (industry/business individuals, government, media and other stakeholders) by speaking in a “language” they understand.


Megan Helmer, President PR Associates


Frontiers in SciComm Policy & Practice

Science, sexism and storytelling

10:30 Room 1600

Let’s face it: Science is still a male-dominated field where gender bias abounds, so it’s no surprise those issues come up in the news too, from the Google manifesto to the Tim Hunt-inspired #distractinglysexy campaign. What issues are facing women in science that science communicators should be aware of? How should we acknowledge and be mindful of gender bias when telling scientists’ stories? And what kinds of tools exist to help us be part of the solution? Join us for a lively discussion.

Moderators

Emily Chung

Emily Chung is a Toronto-based web and radio journalist who covers science and technology for CBC News. She has also been an occasional producer for CBC Radio’s weekly science radio show Quirks & Quarks. She started writing articles about science and other topics while doing her B.Sc. (Western University) and PhD (University of British Columbia) in Chemistry. She did a year-long internship at the Toronto Star and reported for the Vancouver Sun before joining CBC in 2006. She has been involved with the SWCC since winning the Herb Lambert Award in 2003 and has served on the board of directors.

Ivan Semeniuk

Ivan Semeniuk reports on science for The Globe and Mail. A life-long communicator of scientific discoveries and ideas in print and broadcast media, his stories have informed Canadians about topics as diverse as space exploration, genetic engineering and climate change. Prior to joining The Globe and Mail, he was the Washington-based chief of correspondents for the journal Nature, U.S. bureau chief for New Scientist magazine and producer and columnist with Discovery Channel’s Daily Planet. In 2016 he was awarded the Royal Canadian Institute’s Sandford Fleming medal for his contributions to the public understanding of science. He is a current member of the SWCC board.


Panelists


Dr. Gail Murphy


Dr. Gail Murphy assumed the role of Vice-President, Research & Innovation on August 14, 2017.

Dr. Murphy is a Professor in UBC’s Department of Computer Science and was formerly Associate Dean (Research and Graduate Studies) in the Faculty of Science. After completing her B.Sc. at the University of Alberta in 1987, she worked for five years as a software engineer in the Lower Mainland. She later pursued graduate studies in computer science at the University of Washington,earning first an M.Sc. (1994) and then a Ph.D (1996).

Dr. Murphy joined UBC in 1996 and was a key driver of the new Masters of Data Science, aprofessional graduate program launching this fall—and has been instrumental in championing the creation of a Data Science Institute at the university. She also maintains an active research group with post-doctoral and graduate students.

Dr. Murphy’s research focuses on improving the productivity of software developers and knowledge workers by providing the necessary tools to identify, manage and coordinate the information that matters most for their work. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and an Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Distinguished Scientist, as well as co-founder, board member and former Chief Scientist at Tasktop Technologies Incorporated.


Christin Wiedemann

After finishing her Ph.D. in Physics at Stockholm University in 2007, Christin Wiedemann started working in IT as a software developer, but soon discovered that she found software testing to be more interesting and challenging. Changing careers, she started working as a tester, and soon also test lead and trainer. In 2011, she joined PQA Testing in Vancouver as a test lead, and was promoted in 2013 to Regional Delivery Manager. In 2014, she assumed the role of Chief Scientist, using her scientific background to drive PQA’s research and method development. In 2015 she was promoted to Co-CEO; a role focused on service delivery excellence.

Christin is a passionate advocate for women in STEM, a passion she pursues through work and volunteering. Christin is President of SCWIST, the Society for Canadian Women in Science and Technology, and Co-Chair of the BC Chapter of WCT, Women in Communications and Technology.

Tara Martin

Dr Tara Martin recently returned to Canada to take up a Professorship of Conservation Decision Science in the Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences at the University of British Columbia. Prior to this she was a Principle Research Scientist with Australia’s national science agency, CSIRO. Tara is a pioneer in the field of conservation decision making - combining ecological data with decision science to bridge the gap between research and on-ground conservation action. Tara is the recipient of several awards and fellowships, including most recently the 2015 Thomson Reuters Citation & Innovation Award for her work in Climate change decision making and 2017 Wilburforce Fellowship. Tara sits on several national and international panels including the IUCN Climate Change Specialist Group, where she leads the Climate Adaptation theme. She is an associate editor for Conservation Biology and has published over 100 scientific articles.



Nicola Jones 

Nicola Jones is a freelance science journalist living in the mountains of Pemberton, just outside of Whistler BC. She has a BSc in Chemistry and Oceanography, and a Masters in Journalism, both from UBC. She has been a reporter and editor for Nature, where she also helped to commission and edit opinion pieces by academics; she now writes stories across all the physical sciences (from climate change to quantum physics) for Nature, New Scientist, Yale e360 and more.


Frontiers in SciComm Policy & Practice

Ocean Science and Technology Projects - 

1:15 Room 1520

Nicola Jones, Freelance writer (moderator)

Nicola Jones

Nicola Jones is a freelance science journalist living in the mountains of Pemberton, just outside of Whistler BC. She has a BSc in Chemistry and Oceanography, and a Masters in Journalism, both from UBC. She has been a reporter and editor for Nature, where she also helped to commission and edit opinion pieces by academics; she now writes stories across all the physical sciences (from climate change to quantum physics) for Nature, New Scientist, Yale e360 and more.

Greig Bethel, Media Relations Officer at Ocean Networks Canada, 

Greig Bethel 

Greig Bethel is a media relations specialist with 20 years of experience in communications and journalism. Before joining Ocean Networks Canada, he worked as a public affairs officer with the B.C. government; an information officer with the provincial wildfire service; a news editor at the Globe and Mail in Toronto; a sports editor, reporter and blogger at the Vancouver Province; an on-air correspondent for CBC Radio in the Kootenays; and a magazine editor, newspaper columnist and freelance writer.

Greig’s background also includes outdoor adventure, cultural anthropology and creative writing. He has a passion for ocean paddleboarding, and really likes lighthouses and forest fire lookouts. He thinks the oceanscape is more fascinating than outer space, and wants to one day set sail with Steve Zissou.

Greig grew up in the coastal rainforest on a fjord surrounded by mountains, and has lived in ski towns around B.C. Now you will often find him exploring the natural and cultural depths of the reversing tidal rapid near his home in Victoria. @Ocean_Networks

Susan R. Eaton, Founder & Leader, Sedna Epic Expedition

Susan Eaton    

A geoscientist, journalist and conservationist, Susan R. Eaton explores the world’s oceans—from Antarctica to the Arctic—in the snorkel zone, a unique land-sea-ice-air interface where charismatic animals and snorkelers comingle.

Susan studies the interplay of plate tectonics, oceans, glaciers, climate and life in polar regions.

The founder and leader of the 2014-2018 Sedna Epic Expedition, Susan documents disappearing sea ice in the Arctic and delivers ocean education outreach to Inuit youth. Team Sedna is comprised of women ocean explorers, scientists, educators, artists and scuba divers from around the world.

In 2015, the Royal Canadian Geographical Society (the “RCGS”) named Susan one of Canada’s top 100 modern-day explorers and trailblazers. A year later, the RCGS named her one of Canada’s 25 greatest female explorers.

A graduate of Carleton University’ School of Journalism, Susan began her media career in as an on-camera news reporter with CBC-TV. Today, as a freelance writer, she reports on science and technology, business, energy, the environment, space, geotourism and adventure travel. @SusanREaton_Geo  


David Shiffman, PhD

Dr. David Shiffman is a Liber Ero Postdoctoral Fellow at Simon Fraser University, where he studies the conservation of sharks. He is also an award-winning science communicator, with bylines in the Washington Post, Scientific American, Slate, and Gizmodo, as well as hundreds of interviews with outlets including the New York Times, National Public Radio, and CNN. He is the second most-followed marine biologist on twitter in the world, and one of the most-followed scientists on social media in British Columbia. He has taught hundreds of other scientists to use social media, and has published several peer-reviewed papers about using social media to communicate science. @WhySharksMatter

Wendy Palen

Dr. Palen is an Associate Professor of Biological Sciences at Simon Fraser University, where her research focuses on identifying science-based conservation solutions for freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems in the Pacific Northwest and Western Canada. Current projects integrate population dynamics, food web ecology, and risk assessment for species at risk, as well as leverage diverse stakeholder groups on renewable energy and unconventional oil and gas development. Dr. Palen is a founding member of the Earth to Ocean Research Group at SFU, a unique training environment that promotes collaboration, communication, and outreach directly with conservation practitioners and natural resource managers. Dr. Palen helped create the Liber Ero Postdoctoral Fellowship in conservation science, and serves as the program’s Assistant Director. She also serves as Chair for the Board of Directors for the non-profit Evidence for Democracy, Canada’s only science advocacy organization.


Publishing/Career Building

Science Online in Canada

1:15 Room 1600

The internet has long represented the frontier of science communication, as newsroom budgets are slashed and print newspapers closed or downsized. A 2014 report from the Canadian Council of Academies noted that “Canadians increasingly rely on the internet for information on science and technology topics.” Scientists and science communicators have thus developed various strategies to connect directly with the public through online outlets. These outlets include science blogs, combined journalism/communications organizations like The Conversation, content aggregation and curation websites, and scientific content created by universities and other science-related organizations. 

We’ll discuss the rationale behind each communication model and how it’s structured, the target audience for each one and what it means for writing style—and finally, practical tips from experienced writers on how to connect with these outlets and, through them, successfully contribute to online scientific conversations.


Moderator: Theresa Liao @TheresaLiao

Theresa Liao is the Communications Coordinator for the Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of British Columbia. She is usually busy planning science conferences and public events, writing/editing research stories, running after physics summer camp kids, and managing the department’s website and social media channels. Between 2012 and 2016, she maintained her blog, "Science, I Choose You" with a focus on science outreach and women in science. She has served on the core team for Science Borealis, Canada’s science blog network, since 2012; she is currently Tech Lead and Community Outreach Manager. Theresa also co-founded the Curiosity Collider Art-Science Foundation, a Vancouver-based non-profit organization. She is an alumnus of the Banff Science Communications Program, and has more than 10 years of experience in science outreach and communication. Before her Science Communication career, she studied biochemistry and did research about Type 1 Diabetes for her Master’s degree. 

Panel member: Heather Walmsley

Heather Walmsley is the Health & Medicine and Education editor at The Conversation Canada. She is a journalist and interdisciplinary researcher with an MA in postcolonial literatures and a PhD in the ethics and anthropology of biomedicine. From 2012-15 she was a SSHRC Banting Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of British Columbia. She has also worked as a research associate in science journalism at Concordia University, staff writer for Internet Magazine, website editor for Greenpeace UK and freelance education writer for The Independent. Heather has consulted for numerous organizations, including Institute for Development Studies (UK), Mayo Clinic (US), Genome Canada, BC Cancer Agency and Public Health Agency of Canada.

Panel Member: Kristina Campbell, @bykriscampbell

Kristina Campbell (MSc) covers microbiome science for online and print media. She is the author of The Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook (Rockridge Press, 2016) and a co-author of an academic textbook: Gut Microbiota: Interactive Effects on Nutrition and Health (Elsevier, 2018). She writes, consults, and works with scientific advisory boards for microbiome-related organizations throughout Europe and North America.

Panel Member:  David Ng @Ng_Dave

David Ng (http://thisishowitalkscience.tumblr.com) is a geneticist, science literacy academic, part time writer, and faculty based at the Michael Smith Laboratories at the University of British Columbia.  As Director of the Advanced Molecular Biology Laboratory (AMBL), he has had extensive experience in online science communication having initiated a myriad of web-based projects - many of which incorporate science education/literacy elements with the creative and design arts. Of note: (1) he is partly responsible for the massive DNA helix emblazoned on his building’s facade; (2) his Dad beat up Bruce Lee; (3) his first foray into general publishing featured a unicorn on the front cover; and (4) his wife and kids are all exemplary.


Publishing/Career Building

Open Access Science Panel 

1:15 Room 2270

The world of scientific publishing has been rocked by the advent of open access journals, which are available freely on-line, in stark contrast to the often steep subscription prices charged by traditional publications. These efforts to make scientific information more widely available have won widespread praise and support, but they are not without practical challenges, including how to make them economically sustainable. 

Moderator

Tim Lougheed

A full time freelance writer and editor since 1991, Tim Lougheed has written hundreds of articles for specialized and general publications in Canada as well as internationally. He also edits Canadian Chemical News, a magazine published by the Chemical Institute of Canada.

He is the current president of the Science Writers and Communicators of Canada, a national organization with more than 600 members across the country. His career began as a reporter with the Windsor Star and the Sault Star, then as a science writer for Queen’s University. He has degrees from the University of Western Ontario, University of Toronto, and Queen’s University.


Vance Williams 

Vance Williams is an associate professor and the Associate Chair of the Chemistry Department at Simon Fraser University. He is the author of over forty peer-reviewed papers, and sits on the editorial board for the open access journal Materials. In the sphere of science communication, his videos and photographs have been exhibited at the Canadian Museum of Science and Technology, and the Berkeley Art Museum and Film Archive, and he was a contributor to the Science Borealis’ “Reflections: 100 Voices for Canadian Science.” A proponent for making scholarly work free and accessible to the broader public, he is the science representative on the SFU Senate Library Committee and was a member of the subcommittee responsible for drafting SFU’s Open Access Policy in 2016.@vancew

Rebecca Ross

Rebecca Ross is a strategic marketing and communications consultant with over ten years of experience in not-for-profit and private industries with a special focus on transformational, knowledge-based organizations.

Rebecca has held several positions within the academic publishing industry, including Marketing and Communications Manager at Canadian Science Publishing, Canada’s largest, independent, not-for-profit science publisher, Manager of Digital Publishing and International Markets for not-for-profit Livres Canada Books, and head of the digital publishing program at the University of Ottawa Press. Rebecca holds a Masters in Library and Information Studies from the University of Ottawa, a degree in marketing and publishing from Humber College, and a BA in Linguistics. 



Professional Development

Tri-Agency Plus CFI Research Communications Summit – Best Practices

1:15 Room 1900

Science writers and communicators need to be flexible and collaborative. In this special session, we will discuss some best-practices for communicators from research institutions and funding agencies when it comes to new and interesting communications challenges. The session will be broken down into four different presentations with an opportunity for questions and answers. Join us as we network and equip each other with tools and tactics you can take back to your day-to-day work!

Tri-Agency Plus CFI



Professional Development

Digital Tools for Science Communicators - Emily Chung

3:15 Room 1900

No matter what kind of science communication you do, there are apps and online tools that can help you work more efficiently and effectively and/or add a bit of extra pizzaz to your final product. On this panel, three science communicators with very diverse jobs will share the tools they rely on for their work. You’re sure to learn about something useful - and maybe even something amazing - to add to your own digital toolbox.

Moderator: 

 Johanna Wagstaffe, Meteorologist, CBC News 

Johanna Wagstaffe is an on-camera meteorologist for CBC News Network covering national and international weather stories. She joined the CBC News: Weather Centre in the summer of 2007. Wagstaffe's strong background in seismology and earth science is often utilized by CBC for insight into science stories. Some of the stories she has covered recently include the Copenhagen Climate Conference, major seismic events and space missions.

Johanna Wagstaffe graduated with an honours degree in geophysics from The University of Western Ontario. She was first exposed to weather forecasting as a summer intern at the Environment Canada Severe Weather Centre and then obtained her meteorology certificate from York University. Outside of work, Wagstaffe enjoys flying and has both her glider's and pilot's licence. @jwagstaffe


Panelists:

Lauren Kaljur, Reporter, Discourse Media 

Lauren Kaljur is a multimedia journalist specializing in environmental, economic and Indigenous affairs. As a News21 fellow, she uncovered stories about water contamination in Indigenous communities across the United States, with multimedia content published in various U.S. outlets. Her contributions as an investigative reporter for the national collaborative project, the Price of Oil, appeared in the Toronto Star, National Observer and Global News. Before her role at Discourse, Lauren reported for the Yukon News, CBC and Arctic Deeply. Lauren is an avid photographer, videographer and audiophile, carrying a Master of Journalism degree from the University of British Columbia. @laurenkaljur

Jonathan Jarry

Associate, Office for Science and Society, McGill University. Jonathan Jarry is a science communicator with the McGill Office for Science and Society, dedicated to separating sense from nonsense on the scientific stage. He brings his experience in cancer research, human genetics, rehabilitation research, and forensic biology to the work he does for the public. He is the creator, writer, and host of the YouTube show Cracked Science, which uses a late-night deep-dive format to debunk pseudoscience and denounce bad science. With cardiologist Dr. Christopher Labos, he co-hosts the award-winning medical podcast The Body of Evidence, which aims to contextualize findings in the realm of health research and answer the public's most pressing questions about the biomedical sciences while also being funny and entertaining. While many people believe he does not sleep, he still manages to get at least seven hours of sleep a night. His secret shall die with him @crackedscience

Nikki Berreth, Co-founder and Science Communications Specialist, LitScientist 

 Nikki is a science communicator and educator living in Vancouver. With a background in science and fine arts, she's always looking for new ways to relay both scientific and technical knowledge to her intended audience. She aspires to help others reach their full communication potential and has co-founded several organizations that do just that! In the upcoming year, she is looking forward to establishing Science Slam Canada as a national platform for STEM communication, growing LitScientist and breathing life into a new Adult Science adventure. In her free time, you will find her reading crime fiction, playing the ukulele on the beach or writing poetry on the bus @commwinds



Professional Development

Story Pitching Session - Mika McKinnon & Brian Owens

3:15 Room 1600

Pitch your ideas to a panel of high-profile editors and producers.

This session will give attendees an opportunity to pitch their ideas to a panel of 4-6 editors and producers from a variety of publications, and get instant feedback on ways to hone and improve the idea – and if they are lucky, maybe even get a commission. It will be useful for students, journalists, PIOs and scientists who want advice on how best to get their stories picked up by the media.

Moderators:

Brian Owens

Brian Owens is a freelance writer and editor based in New Brunswick. A former news editor at the journal Nature in London, UK, he now writes for a variety of Canadian and international publications including Nature, Science, New Scientist and Hakai Magazine. @BL_Owens


Mika McKinnon

Mika McKinnon is a freelance scientist, taking gigs that focus on being excited and curious in public. She's a science communicator with bylines in io9, BBC, New Scientist, Racked, and others, but she also takes that science into fiction, scrawling equations for Stargate or helping Madam Secretary root its plots in real research. When not lurking around set, she tromps around in the mud with high-voltage geophysical equipment scaring bears, or investigates all the ways the planet is trying to murder us

Panelists

Sonya Buyting: Producer Quirks & Quarks, CBC Radio

Sonya Buyting is an award-winning science journalist and producer for CBC's weekly national radio science show, Quirks & Quarks. She's also worked on other CBC Radio shows such as The Current, Day 6, and even q. Prior to working at CBC Radio, she spent many years as a television producer. She travelled around the world as a story producer for Mayday, the air crash investigation show, which airs in 144 countries, including on Discovery Channel in Canada. She also series produced the astronomy series Cosmic Vistas, as well as the series Festival Bound, a documentary on Quebec's history told through its architecture, and hosted a 26-episode game show called Collector Showdown at High Fidelity HDTV, now Blue Ant Media. She started her television career at Daily Planet on Discovery Channel where she was a segment producer and reporter. Sonya holds an undergraduate degree in chemistry-biology from the University of New Brunswick, and a graduate broadcast journalism degree from Ryerson University. 


Brendan Glauser: Communications Manager at David Suzuki Foundation

Brendan is a marketing communications professional with more than a decade’s experience in journalism, communications, public relations, government relations and digital marketing. He currently manages communications for the David Suzuki Foundation. Brendan initially studied journalism at St. Thomas University on the east coast, and went on to work for the CBC as a radio and television reporter.


Shanna Baker, Hakai Magazine

Shanna Baker is a senior editor at Hakai Magazine, an online publication that explores coastal science and societies. She spends the majority of her time editing feature stories and searching for the next great feature story idea, ripe with a compelling narrative, layers, and surprises. Shanna is also an experienced travel and editorial photographer, whose work has been published widely; she often serves as Hakai Magazine's in-house photographer.


Professional Development

On Copyright, Ethics and Attribution: Interdisciplinary Collaborations Between Artists and Scientists

3:15 room 1520

This session is brought to you by Curiosity Collider and Voirelia

Interdisciplinary work is stimulating and can open opportunities for innovation, but it can also raise ethical questions and challenges. If the guidelines and requirements do not completely overlap, which ones should be followed?

In this session, we will explore the ethics of using an artist’s work in a scientific context, addressing the following aims:

1.To provide a cultural understanding of how art is used in a scientific context

2.To define proper attribution in oral, performance, and written work

3.To raise awareness of when attribution and/or royalties are due to the artist whose work is being used in a scientific context: when is citing enough and when should an artist be paid?

We will work through case studies, followed by a discussion with a panel of experts from diverse backgrounds. Meet our panellists:

 Meet our panellists: 


Kate Campbell

Kate Campbell has been working as a biomedical communications specialist for the past 7 years. Incorporating both traditional and digital techniques, Kate creates unique and specialized visualizations, animations and interactive media to communicate scientific and medical content. You might find her work published in print (such as textbooks, journal articles, brochures and booklets) or as digitally media (such as website, interactive tools, videos or slideshow presentations). More recently, since 2015, Kate has developed a library of evidence based and accredited online courses for healthcare practitioners across the province in her role as Senior Instructional Designer with UBC’s Faculty of Medicine’s Division of Continuing Professional Development (UBC CPD). At UBC CPD, Kate designs online courses and educational material by translating knowledge from subject matter experts into engaging, visually rich and interactive digital media. Her current focus is to enhance learner experiences in order to create lasting educational and behavioural outcomes.

Steven J. Barnes 

Dr. Steven Barnes is the Assistant Head of Undergraduate Affairs in UBC's Department of Psychology.  He is well known for his work related to student mental health and wellbeing.  Steven is also an accomplished artist--his current art practice is centered around the production of new media pieces that aim to inspire dialogue on the ways we think about and use modern technologies.  He also continues to produce drawings and paintings.  Steven is co-author of a best-selling textbook on Behavioural Neuroscience, Biopsychology 10th edition (Pearson). @ sj_barnes


April Britski

April Britski is the National Executive Director of CARFAC, Canada’s national association for visual and media artists. She joined the staff of CARFAC National in 2005, and has worked and volunteered as an art educator, curator, and arts administrator since 1998. She has an MA in Canadian Art History from Carleton University, and a BA in Art History and Studio Art from the University of Saskatchewan. She is a co-founder of Artists Legal Services Ottawa, and the Visual Arts Alliance, and has served on the board of directors of CARFAC Saskatchewan, Galerie SAW Gallery, the Canadian Senior Artist Resource Network, and the Coalition for Cultural Diversity. In 2010, she worked in the UK on secondment with Artquest, the Design and Artists Copyright Society, and Artists’ Interaction and Representation. In 2017, she worked with Arden Ryshpan, Executive Director of Canadian Actors Equity Association, through the CHRC’s Talent to Lead mentorship program. She currently lives and works in Burnaby. twitter handle : @carfacnational website: carfac.ca


Lawrence Chan

Lawrence is a partner at SMITHS IP, an intellectual property law firm in Vancouver. He prepares and prosecutes patent, trademark, copyright, and industrial design applications. He is a registered Canadian patent and trademark agent and is authorized to practice before the United States Patent and Trademark Office in patent and trademark matters. Lawrence has appeared before the Federal Court, the Federal Court of Appeal, and the Supreme Court of British Columbia on various intellectual property matters.

His patent practice focuses on inventions in the mechanical, biotechnological, and software fields. His practice also includes intellectual property litigation, involving both infringement actions and appeals from administrative tribunals. Lawrence also advises clients about licensing and other agreements involving intellectual property.

website: stevenjbarnes.com

Moderators

Theresa Liao, Co-founder and Community Relations Director, Curiosity Collider

Theresa Liao is the Co-founder and Community Relations Director for Curiosity Collider Art-Science Foundation, a Vancouver based non-profit organization. Curiosity Collider is committed to providing opportunities for artists whose work expresses scientific concepts and scientists who collaborate with artists. We challenge the perception and experience of science in our culture, break down the walls between art and science, and engage our growing community to bringing life to the concepts that describe our world.

Theresa works at UBC Department of Physics & Astronomy as the Communications Coordinator. Between 2012 and 2016, she maintained her blog, "Science, I Choose You" with a focus on science outreach and women in science. She has served on the core team for Science Borealis, a Canadian Science Blogging network, since 2012. She is an alumnus of the Banff Science Communications Program, and has more than 10 years of experience in science outreach and communication. Twitter: @theresaliao and @ccollider

Website: curiositycollider.org 

Sarah Louadi, Core Consultant (Science, Art, Dance), Voirelia

Photo credits: Ivan Yastrebov

Sarah Louadi is a Core Consultants for Voirelia, a Vancouver-based hub that brings together dancers, photographers, painters, psychologists, musicians, scientists, and people who are simply curious about dance and psychology. We aim to create original dance and art works inspired by ideas in psychology and existential philosophy.

She is currently completing a Master’s in Experimental Medicine at UBC, where she studies the interaction between protein aggregates and the brain immune cells in Alzheimer’s disease. Sarah has led multiple projects, such as monthly speaker series with the UBC Mental Health Awareness Club for 5 years and incorporating a summer Art Therapy program in a seniors centre in 2015. She was the co-lead for the creation of a dance on traumatic brain injury for the Universe of the Brain at the HR. MacMillan Centre, as one of the first Voirelia projects. Twitter: @AVSotskova

Website: voirelia.com


Frontiers in SciComm Policy & Practice

Parks Canada - google expeditions and virtual reality tours - behind the scenes

3:15 Room 2270

Be ready to experience Parks Canada's cool new VR system for yourself during this session. And walk through the steps Parks Canada went through to decide to adopt it, and how it went from a suggestion to a practical display at the Byward Market in Ottawa last summer. Jeff Bolingbroke


In the meantime, right now - you can enjoy the google expeditions of these British Columbia Parks. Clicking each link below will send you directly to the content within Google maps. For more information about exploring this content, go to: How to explore using Google Street View.



SWCC AGM

4:45pm - 6:00pm

Room 1520


SUNDAY APRIL 15

Choice of Field Trips

Snorkel Safari: Bringing The Ocean to Eye Level

Sunday, April 15, 10:00am to 3:00pm

Sea Dragon Charters, Horseshoe Bay


Don a wetsuit, mask, fins and snorkel, and plunge beneath the waves of Howe Sound. British Columbia’s nutrient rich waters are home to world-renowned marine biodiversity—kelp forests, colorful invertebrates, rock fish nurseries, and numerous species of whales and dolphins. 

The snorkel safari provides an intimate, experiential learning opportunity: Participants will explore the Pacific Ocean’s intricate web of life and discuss how warming oceans are pushing some species to the edge. Lucky snorkelers may experience up-close-and-personal encounters with harbor seals at Pam Rocks (they like chewing on white-colored fins!). 

SWCC member and polar snorkeler Susan R. Eaton will lead the snorkel safari. Jett Britnell, BC-based underwater, wildlife and expedition photographer, will document the snorkel safari for the SWCC. Water safety will be provided by certified snorkel guides with Sea Dragon Charters of Horseshoe Bay. All equipment, including sea kayaks, is included in the excursion. Participants must be able to swim confidently. A non-snorkeler ride-along discount is also available. Hot drinks and snacks will be provided on the boat. Space is limited and available on a first come basis. 

For more details: https://www.seadragoncharters.com/snorkel-kayak

$120 Snorkel and Kayak

$90 Non-snorkeler ride-along option

Note: Transportation not included in price: City Express Bus from downtown Vancouver to Horseshoe Bay is recommended

Leader: Susan R. Eaton



A geoscientist, journalist and conservationist, Susan R. Eaton explores the world’s oceans—from Antarctica to the Arctic—in the snorkel zone, a unique land-sea-ice-air interface where charismatic animals and snorkelers co-mingle. She studies the interplay of plate tectonics, oceans, glaciers, climate and life in polar regions. The founder and leader of the 2014-2018 Sedna Epic Expedition, Susan documents disappearing sea ice in the Arctic and delivers ocean education outreach to Inuit youth. Team Sedna is comprised of women ocean explorers, scientists, educators, artists and scuba divers from around the world.

In 2015, the Royal Canadian Geographical Society (the “RCGS”) named Susan one of Canada’s top 100 modern-day explorers and trailblazers. A year later, the RCGS named her one of Canada’s 25 greatest female explorers. A graduate of Carleton University’ School of Journalism, Susan began her media career in as an on-camera news reporter with CBC-TV. Today, as a freelance writer, she reports on science and technology, business, energy, the environment, space, geotourism and adventure travel. @SusanREaton_Geo


Royal BC Museum, Victoria

10:00 am - 2:00pm

Delegates are invited to make their own way to Victoria via float plane, ferry connector bus, or public transit  to participate in the sessions organized for Sunday, April 15. If plan to fly home from Victoria, the Victoria International Airport, YYJ, is 30km away (half hour by taxi) with direct and connecting flights all over Canada.

Royal BC Museum, Victoria

10:00 am - 2:00pm

Science Communications at the Epicentre, Municipal & Provincial Policy in Victoria, with University of Victoria


Moderator


Kathryn Jastremski

Kathryn recently completed a PhD in Social and Ecological Sustainability at the University of Waterloo. Her research experience includes developing frameworks to support complex decision making in sustainability, with an emphasis on public involvement and collaborative processes. Through Mitacs’ Canadian Science Policy Fellowship, Kathryn is working with British Columbia’s Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development to develop tools for resource management decisions that balance both economic and social interests in the province.

What role does scientific research play in government policies and decision-making? What are the most effective strategies to build these connections, and is there room for improvement? This panel discussion will focus on how scientific information is used in decision-making at all levels of government (municipal, provincial, federal). By sharing their experiences on issues such as cycling infrastructure, municipal sewage treatment plants, and wildlife conservation, the panelists will discuss possible paths from science to policy, and strategies for engaging and communicating effectively with policy-makers.

Panelists

Karen Laberee

Karen Laberee is the Executive Director of BikeMaps.org, a University of Victoria research project that harnesses the power of citizen science to collect bike incident data. Karen is also the Victoria Project Coordinator for the INTErventions, Research and Action in Cities Team (INTERACT) – a five-year national research collaboration examining the impact of urban interventions on health and well-being. Karen holds an MSc from Western University in Biology.

Dr. Edward Ishiguro

Dr. Edward Ishiguro is Professor Emeritus at University of Victoria, and a Member of the Department of Biochemistry & Microbiology since 1977, having served 8 years as Department Chair. His research interests in molecular microbiology with a focus on the basis for antibiotic tolerance in bacteria. He was awarded the Faculty of Science Teaching Excellence Award in 2005 and the UVic Alumni Association Harry Hickman Award for Teaching Excellence in 2006. He has instructed at both Camosun College and Royal Roads University, and is actively involved in making current science understandable to lay audiences through the UVic Speakers Bureau. He recently collaborated with Natasha Haskey and Kristina Campbell to write a textbook on gut bacteria, their interaction with diet, and their role in our health and illness. The book was published in January 2018.                                                          

Dr. Ishiguro was a scientific advocate for sewage treatment in Victoria for over 30 years. Having worked mostly as a freelancer, has was at times associated with the Victoria Sewage Treatment Alliance (VSTA) and the T. Buck Suzuki Foundation (TBSF). He was the main speaker at a public forum organized by these organizations entitled “Victoria’s Sewage: Separating Myth from Fact” (September 26, 2005, Gibson Auditorium, Camosun College). He was a member of the CRD Core Area and West Shore Sewage Treatment Technical and Community Advisory Committee (TCAC) from its inception to its disbanding (2007-2016). 



Chris Genovali

Chris Genovali is the Executive Director of the Raincoast Conservation Foundation. With a mission of “investigate, inform, and inspire,” Chris Genovali leads Raincoast Conservation Foundation’s effective, science based programs to protect the lands, waters, and wildlife of coastal British Columbia. Chris received the Conservation Leadership Award in 2015 from the Wilburforce Foundation. Chris is a prolific writer, with articles, op-eds and features on Canadian wildlife and conservation issues widely published in Canada and internationally. He was a contributor to Animals and the Environment: Advocacy, activism, and the quest for common ground published in 2015, and Wild Foresting: Practicing Nature's Wisdom published in 2008. Chris has also appeared as a spokesperson on various radio and television outlets. 

Building Relationships and Engaging Indigenous Communities

Session Summary

I will share some my personal experiences and views on how journalists and communicators can rethink what they are writing in a time of reconciliation. Media has an important role to play in delivering messages that encourage a fuller understanding of our countries collective past so that First Nations voices can truly be heard and their diversity and connection to place understood.  The real threat to an inclusive society is the non-dissemination of knowledge for future generations.  Some writers have tried to tell stories with the best intentions and within the rules of their industry; but lack a basic understanding of best practices from either an interdisciplinary or Indigenous viewpoint.  These are longstanding philosophical issues, but there has to be space to start the conversation.  Meaningful journeys begin with the willingness to take small steps into topics that can grow into generational positive change.

Siemthult - Michelle Washington

Ahjechwut, my ancestral name is Siemthlut and I am known as Michelle Washington.  I was born and raised in the village of Tla’amin which is a Northern Coast Salish Nation.  I also have ancestral ties to Sechelt and Maori on my grandfather’s side and Klahoose and Sto:lo on my grandmother’s side.  I am so thankful to be raising my family in the beautiful homeland of the Lkwungen speaking people now known as Victoria.  I have completed studies in Public Sector Management and Aboriginal Governance at UVIC and have returned to continue studies in Anthropology.

Recent work includes managing the exhibition “Our Living Languages” for First Peoples’ Cultural Council at the Royal BC Museum.  Programming with the Office of Indigenous Affairs at UVIC and have also worked for my Nation and others in several capacities including Lands and Resources, Governance, Culture and Treaty for well over a decade.  I am also the liaison for a multi-year archaeology, anthropology and history field school project with Simon Fraser University and the University of Saskatchewan. 


The Science Behind the Scenes at RBCM

Amina Chergui

The Royal BC Museum is known for immersive diorama’s that locate visitors within the landscape of BC and highlight the diverse views of its Natural History. But how do the exhibits come to be, and what is the science that happens behind the scenes? This tour will take a secret passage to the other side of the displays, and showcase the collection of specimens that make the museum so valuable. The tour will be led by museum educator Amina Chergui, with a visit and conversation with a Royal BC Museum Natural History Curator.

Free time in museum or to explore Victoria


Things to do in downtown Victoria (within a block or two of RBCM)


High Tea at the Empress Hotel http://www.fairmont.com/empress-victoria/dining/tea-at-the-empress/

Shopping on Government Street http://www.10best.com/destinations/canada/victoria/downtown/shopping/government-street-trounce-alley-bastion-square/

Visit Beacon Hill Park http://www.victoria.ca/EN/main/residents/parks/beacon-hill.htm


Travel to Victoria from Vancouver

Air

The most convenient, comfortable and expensive way to get to downtown Victoria from downtown Vancouver is via Harbour Air Seaplanes. A 35 minute flight offers unparalleled views of the Strait of Georgia and the Gulf Islands. Registered delegates will get a 20% conference discount. Detailed information is on the Travel and Accommodation page. Last minute specials are also often offered for $99. RBCM is a short waterfront walk from the float plane. Departure from Vancouver is Burrard Landing, Canada Place

BC Ferries Connector Bus

BC Ferries has a connector bus. The bus can be boarded at several locations in downtown Vancouver, including major hotels, or on board the ferry at Tsawwassen. It can still be pricey, the fare from the Vancouver Fairmont Hotel to downtown Victoria is $70+ (but does include your ferry ticket). More information at bcfconnector.com.

Public Transit

Much less expensive (but also less comfortable and less convenient) is public transit. There are two different Canada Line trains from Waterfront Station. One goes to YVR/Airport, and the other goes to Bridgeport Station. Take the Bridgeport Station train to the terminus at Bridgeport. Go downstairs to street level and board the 620 Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal bus. Disembark at the ferry terminal, purchase your Swartz Bay ticket and walk on. On board you can either purchase a BC Ferries Connector ticket (see above) for $30+ or disembark from the ferry at Swartz Bay and take the #70 bus to downtown Victoria. 

Car

BC Ferries runs every hour on the odd hour from 7am to 9pm between Tsawwassen (30km outside Vancouver) and Swartz Bay (35km north of Victoria). A vehicle and driver usually cost ~$73 one way. Schedules and reservations are found at www.bcferries.com


RBCM is located right across from the Victoria bus station on the inner harbour. You are minutes away from the Empress Hotel, sightseeing, waterfront walking and shopping where you can relax and absorb everything you’ve learned! It’s the perfect end to a busy conference.

Where to stay in Victoria

Best Western Inner Harbour

Days Inn – Victoria on the harbour

Hotel Grande Pacific


Flying Home from Victoria 

The Victoria International Airport, YYJ, is 30km away (half hour by taxi) with direct and connecting flights all over Canada.


Travel and Accommodation information is available here

Register Here